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LIBRARY OF 

LASELL JUNIOR COLLEGE 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



G/1ZI 



1? 

13 fr"? 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Federally funded with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners 



http://archive.org/details/allerlei1907unse 



Salutatory 



E 



'ROM you, first of all, dear Faculty, kindest of friends, but sever- 
est of critics, we ask a lenient judgment of this, '07's Allerlei. 
You would gladly have spared us our labor, we know, but rather 
than relinquish what we consider our privilege, our duty, we chose the 
labor. And it has not been all labor. No, indeed ; for in the pleasure of 
others we find our fullest pleasure, and our hope is, that some of these 
pages may draw a smile — nay, even a laugh from the reader. From you, 
Seniors, we ask that the past year may, in memory, be ever present with 
you as you turn the leaves of this book. Your own experience may, we 
trust, blunt the edges of your criticism. We have most to fear from you, 
undergraduates, for as yet your Allerleis are glorious publications of the 
future, by comparison with which our book must suffer. May all linger 
long over the good, and quickly forget the imperfect, in this little book. 






LI 
^ s ORND ALE, **£ 



._*•<—%. 



GTU 




jvBi\ K .V/Ofl 




To 

DR. GUY M. WINSLOW, Ph.D. 

Whose personality we greatly admire, and for whose scholarly 
attainments we have the deepest regard, 

WE DEDICATE THIS BOOK 




With best wishes for Lasell '07 from 
THEODORE ROOSEVELT 

February 17th, 1906 




CHARLES CUSIIMAN BRAGDON 
Principal of Lasell 



Lditorial Staff 

Martha R. Laurens, Editor in ChieJ 
Helen E. Carter \ 

\ Assistant Editors 
Jessie Tucker ( 

Etta Handy ) 

Marion Stahl, Business Jfanager 

Lillian Douglass 



Assistant J/anagers 
Subscription Agents 



Florence Disman 

Elizabeth Bacon 

Cornelia Eaton 

Cora Danforth 

Esther Levi > Advertising Agents 

Edna Sisson 



THE ALLERLEI FACULTY 



Faculty 



Charles Cushman Bragdon, A.M., LL.D. 

Principal 

Caroline A. Carpenter 

Assistant Principal, Efiglish Literature, History 

Guy M. Winslow, Ph.D. 

Natural Sciences 
(In charge during the Principal's absence.) 

Lillie R. Potter 

Preceptress ; Manners ; Dress 

Lillian M. Packard, A.B. 

Mathematics 

Margaret Rand, A.B. 

Assistant in Mathematics ; Philosophy; Economics 

Mary P. Witherbee 

English 

Jeanne Le Royer 

French 

Blanche C. Martin 

Reading ; Expression 

Lottie Evelyn Bates, B.A. 

Latin ; Greek 

Desdemona Louisa Heinrich 

German 

Dr. Homer B. Sprague 

Shakespeare 

Claude Marie Frances 

Director of Physical Culture 

Fanny A. Dunsford 

Assistant Gymnasium and Swimming' 



10 



THE ALLERLEI FACULTY 

Annie Payson Call 

Nerve Training 

Capt. Charles A. Ranlett 

Military Drill 

Mary L. Nutt 

Care of Health 

Joseph A. Hills 
Pianoforte 

Louisa F. Parkhurst 

Pianoforte 

Margaret E. Lowell 

Assistant Pianoforte 

Priscilla White 
Voice Culture 

Helen Goodrich 

Associate in Voice Culture 

Henry M. Dunham 

Organ: Harmony ; Chorus Singing 

S. E. Goldstein 

Violin 

Mary Augusta Mullikin 

Drawing ; Painting; History of Art 

Miriam N. Loomis 

Cooking Demonstrations and Practice ; Experiment Hall ; Home Sanitation 

Bertha W. Ferguson 

Bookkeeping ; Pcn?nanship 

Mary E. Cutting 

Serving; Dress Cutting 

Alice Fiske 

Millinery 

Catherine M. Green 

Ph o n ograp Ay 



Angeline C. Blaisdell 

Treasurer 



II 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



Andrews, Marie Le Baron .... Parkersburg, W. Va. 
" Little at the first, but mighty at the last." 




i. Nickname 

11 Marie Le Baron' 1 '' 

2. Pet expression 



3. Ideal 

4. Antipathy 



"R-e-a-l-ly" 

, Ina Harber 

Herself 



5. Ambition 

. To make others happy 

6. Peculiarity 

Liking for Shakespeare 



7. In love with 

• • • 

8. Minus 

9. Will be 

• • • 

10. Supe 



Green peas 

Conceit 

A hvays popula r 

. Fern Dixon 



S. D. 
MAsquER 

Editor in Chief of 
'06's Allerlei 



12 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



Anthony, Edith Hastings . . . South Dartmouth, Mass. 

" Neat as a piii^ and blooming as a rose." 




i. Nickname 



'Bdie 



" j?si;„ " 



2. Pet expression 

' ' O dear ! Ivnant a letter " 



3. Ideal 

4. Antipathy 



De Pachmann 
. Cereal 



5. Ambition 

To be a great mu$icia?i 

6. Peculiarity 

. Desire for kiiozvlcdge 

7. In love with 

Fa 71 

S. Minus 

Self-consciousness 

9. Will be 

A voted pianist 

10. Supe 

Florence Lane 

Lasellia 

Secretary of Senior Class 

President in '06's Junior Year 



l 3 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



Blackstock, Anna Grant .... Shahjahanpore, India 
" Hang sorrow ; care will kill a cat.'" 




i. Nickname 

2. Pet expression 



"Blackie" 
"O Pel" 



3. Ideal 

A girl who can get high 
marks without study 



4. Antipathy 



Snobs 



5. Ambition 

To have as matty strikes as 
possible 

6. Peculiarity 

Singing Rufus ' JRastus Joh?i- 
son Broivn 



7. In love with 

8. Minus 

9. Will be 
10. Supe 



Bob 
Never a smile 
. 21 years old 



Mary Masters 
Lasellia 



H 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



Buehner, Meta Marie ...... Portland, Ore. 

" The black-blue Irish hair, the Irish eyes." 




i. Nickname 

"Beany" 

2. Pet expression 

"0 dear!" (with a gentle 
giggle) 

3. Ideal 

A D(e)ut(s)ch teacher 

4. Antipathy 

A study in octaves 

5. Ambition 

To become a?i imperso?iator 

6. Peculiarity 

A love of brass buttons 

7. In love with 



8. Minus 

9. Will be 
10. Supe 



French finery 

. Pallor 

Married soon 

Louise Kelly 



Lasellia 
Masojjek 
Vice President of Class 



15 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



Buehner, Margarita Catherine 



Portland, Ore. 



" Oh, when I see that smile appear 
My heart again is filled with cheer .'" 




i. '.Nickname 



"Rita" 



2. Pet expression 

"It makes me tired" 



3. Ideal 

4. ^Antipathy 

5. Ambition 

6. Peculiarity 

7. In love with 

8. Minus 

9. Will be 
10. Supe 



A traveler 

To be i?i a hospital 

To be a Nurse (?) 

Neat '» ess 

Shoes. Herself 



. Height 



A doctor's xvife 



Cora Danforth 



Delta 



16 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



Butler, Vera Marie ...... Beaver Falls, Pa. 

" Her neat figure, her sober, womanly step." 




i. Nickname 

2. Pet expression 



"Jiffs" 

"Billy" 



3. Ideal 

A neat little cottage built 
for two 

4. Antipathy 

A mansion zvitk scores of 
servants 

5. Ambition 

To get married 

6. Peculiarity 

Promptness on all occasions 

7. In love with 

Billy 

8. Minus 

Collar buttons 

9. Will be 

A popular Society -woman 

10. Supe 

Alice J. Chase 

Lasellia 



17 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



Butterfield, Ruth Elizabeth .... Kingman, Me. 

" A good child on the whole, meek, manageable." 




i. Nickname 



"Rufus" 



2. Pet expression 

"If I could only graduate " 



3. Ideal 

4. Antipathy 



A?i old maid 
Squalling infant 



5. Ambition 

To go in search of adventure 

6. Peculiarity 

Fondness for going to church 

7. In love with 

. Somebody ? 

8. Minus 

Ability to get up -when the 
gong rings in the morning 

9. Will be 

Successful in any under- 

t a king 
10. Supe 

Marion Atwell 

Gamma Tau 



18 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



Caldwell, Sarah Cunningham . . . Corpus Christi, Texas 

" I am a pattern for housewives.'" 




i. Nickname 

. "Sawa/i " 

2. Pet expression 

' ' Fo r p ity's sake ' ' 

3. Ideal 

The owner of a sailboat 

4. Antipathy 

The Q.45 P.M. bell 

5. Ambition 

To be somebody's housekeeper 

6. Peculiarity 

. Her laugh and sneeze 

7. In love with 

. '■''Those -who love ?ne" 



8. Minus 

9. Will be 
10. Supe 



A temper 

A society matron 

Anne Vickery 



Delta 



19 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



Carter, Helen Frances . . . . , . Dorchester, Mass. 

" There was something very winning in her haughty manner." 




i. Nickname 



"Hully" 



2. Pet expression 

. "No-o, really?" 

3. Ideal 

One who has a?i aim in life 

4. Antipathy 

Crushes 

5. Ambition 

To be a literary success 

6. Peculiarity 

Her love of study 

7. In love with 

One zvho is yet to come 

8. Minus 

Flesh 

9. Will be 

. Missionary 

10. Supe 

Helen A. Wait 

Delta 

Treasurer of Senior Class 



20 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



Cogswell, Marie ....... Portland, Ore. 

" Talked she knew ?tot why, nor cared not why." 




I. 


Nickname 


. 


' ' Cogsie ' ' 


2. 


Pet expression 






• 


• 


"Say!" 


3- 


Ideal 










A 


business rvoma?t 


4- 


Antipathy 








• 


A 


society butterfly 



5. Ambition 

To earn her oivn money 

6. Peculiarity 

Affectation 

7. In love with 

Herself 

8. Minus 

A superfluity of flesh 

9. Will be 

A leader of IVonran's Suf- 
frage 

Etta Handy 



10. Supe 



21 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



Dealey, Annie 



Dallas, Texas 



" O, blest with temper whose unclouded ray 
Can make to-morrow cheerful as to-day.'" 




i. Nickname 

2. Pet expression 

3. Ideal 



"Dealey A " 
"Mercy me IV 
A red-cheeked lassie 



4. Antipathy 

To get up on Sunday mornings 



5. Ambition 



To be a great artist 



6. Peculiarity 

Rapid jioiv of speech 

7. In love with 

. Bookkeeping (?) 

A strike 

Celebrated linguist (?) 

Esther Levi 



8. Minus 



9. Will be 



10. Supe 



Lasellia 

Member of Art Club 



22 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



Dealey, Fannie 



Dallas, Texas 



" Thot( art a scholar." 




i. Nickname 



"Fan" 



2. Pet expression 

. ll Na-ozv Annie" 

3. Ideal 





. A comfortable matron 


4- 


Antipathy 






. 


To serve salad 


5- 


Ambition 






To be a 


charming hostess 


6. 


Peculiarity 


Lisping 


7- 


In love with 


Ho zisekeef ing 


8. 
9- 


Minus 
Will be 


. Slenderness 



10. 



Supe 



. Ranchman's -wife 

Jessie Tucker 
Lasellia 



23 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



Fuller, Margaret May ..... Pawtucket, R. I. 

" I hold it sinful to despond" 




i. Nickname 

. "Maggy May" 

2. Pet expression 

" "Tis that ; you hnoxv" 

3. Ideal 

A striking man 

4. Antipathy 

To four cocoa 

5. Ambition 

To travel 

6. Peculiarity 

Ability to squelch 

7- In love with 

. Dartmouth 

8. Minus 

. Bashfulness 

9. Will be 

A leader at Dartmouth 



10. Supe 



Ed?ia Sisson 



S. D. 



24 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



Graham, Florence Gertrude .... Toledo, Ohio 

" Thon may est see a sunshine a/id a hail in me at once.'" 




i. Nickname 



2. Pet expression 



" Gertie' 



"O, talk to me!" 



3. Ideal 



Any inhabitant of Toledo 

4. Antipathy 

. Boston 

5. Ambition 

To go to matinees 

6. Peculiarity 

Ways of hairdressing 

7. In love -with 

. . Cora Penniman 

8. Minus 

Never the blue silk -vaist 

9. Will be 



Good housekeeper 



10. Supe 



Bess Judson 



Lasellia 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



Harber, Ina Martha ...... Bloomington, 111. 

" She had the blithest little laugh yon ever heard" 




i. Nickname 

"Lizzie Martha To Boom" 

2. Pet expression 

" Oh, you villain !" 



3. Ideal 



William Gillette 



4. Antipathy 

Things that do not harmonize 

5. Ambition 

. r \To have everyone love her 

6. Peculiarity 

Her laugh 



7- 


In love 


with 




. Ca 


ramels and mint wafers 


8. 


Minus 


The kissing habit 


9- 
0. 


Will be 

Supe 


A leader of society 

Jennie Johnson 

S. D. 

Masquer 



26 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



Johnson, Belle Augusta ..... Williston, Vt. 

kl Slie takcth most delight in music instruments and in poetry" 




i. Nickname 

2. Pet expression 



"Belle" 
"My dear" 



3. Ideal 

A musician -with floxving 

mane 

4. Antipathy 

To flay hymns 

5. Ambition 

To become a great musician 



6. Peculiarity 

7. In love with 

8. Minus 



Love for music 

German grammar 

. A lost heart 



9. Will be 

A prim little housekeeper 



10. Supe 



Marjorie Gunn 
Lasellia 



27 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



Johnston, Mildred 



Evanston, 111. 



" A dimple is a tiny thing, to dream of and regret ; 
Bid how that dimple twinkled — I never can forget ." 




i. Nickname 



' 'Joknny ' ' 



2. Pet expression 

" Ok, that scared me so ! " 

3. Ideal 

Maude, because she is over 
Jive feet tall 

4. Antipathy 

Dimples 



5. Ambition 



6. Peculiarity 



To go on the stage 



. Extreme neatness 



7. In love with 



Winnie, etc. 



8. Minus 

Height, but makes tip for it 

•vuith a diminutive 

pompadour 

9. Will be 

. Kindergarten tcacker 



10. Supe 



. Heleti E. Carter 
Lasellia 

MASqUER 



28 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



Krag, Cornnie Marguerite ..... Columbus, Ohio 

" A spirit fit to start an empire." 




i. Nickname 

"Kr aggie" 

2. Pet expression 

. '"Oh, you dot" 

3. Ideal 

Happy married life 

4. Antipathy 

. Old maidenhood 

5. Ambition 

To get married 

6. Peculiarity 

Loves to argue 

7. In love with 

R. E. K. 

8. Minus 

. A solitaire and height 

9. Will be 

Mrs. R. E. K. 

10. Supe 

. Edna Cones 



29 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



Marston, Ruth Eldredge ..... Campello, Mass. 
" They say she knew much that she never told.' 1 '' 




i. Nickname 

2. Pet expression 

3. Ideal 



"Tufh'e' 
"You piker!" 



A dignified professor 

4. Antipathy 

An insignificant man 

5. Ambition 

To becotne a missionory to 
Japan 

6. Peculiarity 

Fondfiess for study 



7. In love with 

8. Minus 



All "Japs" 
. Height 



9. Will be 

An Ideal xvife and mother 



10. Supe 



Mary J. Richardson 
Gamma Tau 



30 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



Mattlage, Clara Kathryn 



New York, N. Y 



" That same face of yours looks like the title page to a whole 
volume of roguery . ' ' 




i. Nickname 

2. Pet expression 

3. Ideal 



"Prissy" 

"Lucy" 

Alar ion Stahl 



4. Antipathy 

Violets (?) Dancing (?) 

5. Ambition 

To have a train 

[6. Peculiarity 

Fondness for others 

7. In love with 

Cornell 

8. Minus 

Hairpins 

9. Will be 

Eighteen 

10. Supe 

Marion Stahl 

S. D. 



3i 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



McClanahan, Kathryn Gwendolyn . . . Omaha, Neb. 

" She tells you Jlatly what her mind is." 




i. Nickname 



'Kate' 



2. Pet expression 

. " Snappy work 



3. Ideal 

4. ^Antipathy 



. Tech juiiior 
Ph ila de Ip h ia 



5. Ambition 

To design headings for col- 
lege clubs 

6. Peculiarity 

Not caring for social life 



7. In love with 

8. Minus 



The West 
Hard work 



9. Will be 

Touring -with Miss Mullikin 



10. Supe 



Ethel Wilde 



Lasellia 

Editor of Lasell Leaves 

Member of Art Club 



3 2 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



Peirce, Carrie Mildred ..... Brookline, Mass. 

" So light of foot, so light of spirit . " 




i. Nickname 



"Milly" 



2. Pet expression 

" You're a nice one! " 



3. Ideal 



Fra) 



4. Antipathy 

Some persons at N. \V. 

5. Ambition 

To be a child actress 



6. Peculiarity 

7. In love with 

8. Minus 

9. Will be 



Ability to talk fast 
Teddy 
Straight hair 
Brookline society belle 



10. Supe 

. Cornelia Hitchcock Eaton 

S. D. 
Masquer 



33 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



Potter, Julia Elizabeth ..... Milwaukee, Wis. 

" I have a jest for all I meet." 




i. Nickname 

2. Pet expression 

3. Ideal 

4. Antipathy 

5. Ambition 



"Jule" 

' ' Cheer up " 

A trained nurse 

Back 



. To be a musician 

6. Peculiarity 

. o . Soberness (?) 

7. In love with 

„ o . Miss Parkkurst 

8. Minus 

Work(?) 

9. Will be 

Doctor's vjife 

10. Supe 



Ida Sisson 



S. D. 



34 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



Sauter, Irene Margaret . . . . Westfield, Mass. 

" Gentle in mien, word, and tongue." 




i. Nickname 

2. Pet expression 

3. Ideal 



"Babe" 
"My l-a-nd!" 



Good housekeeper 

4. Antipathy 

To flirt ivitk knozvn me?i 

5. Ambition 

To travel 

6. Peculiarity 

. Fondness for sxueet pickles 

7. In love with 

Rabbits 



8. Minus 

9. Will be 
10. Supe 



Pounds 

. Mrs. R. S. 

. Lillia?i Douglass 
S. D. 



35 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



Simes, Maude Burbank ..... 

" A pearl of great ft rice." 



Boston, Mass. 




i. Nickname 

2. Pet expression 



"Maudie" 

" That's elegant" 



3. Ideal 

A pedagogue of the first 



4. Antipathy 

5. Ambition 



'water 
High society 

To do something 



6. Peculiarity 

Wonderful executive ability 

7. In love with 

Sunday morning breakfast !! 



8. Minus 

9. Will be 
10. Supe 



. Friends (???) 

. Model housetvife 

Katherine L. Batch 



Laseleia 
Masquer 

President of Senior Class 
President of Missionary 
Society 



36 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



Straight, Maie Blanche 



Kent, Conn. 



" High flights she had, and wit at will, 
And so her tongue is seldom still." 




i. Nickname 

2. Pet expression 



"Maybe" 
"Nibble" 



3. Ideal 

Woman zvith indivisible heart 



4. Antipathy 

5. Ambition 

6. Peculiarity 

J 

7. In love with 

8. Minus 



Doughnuts 



To be married 

Fo n dn ess fo r Jap s 
Paul 
Cu rls 



9. Will be 

Calvc's successor if given 



10. Supe 



time 
Kathcrinc Szvctt 



37 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



Strong, Sarah Harriet .... Amsterdam, N. Y. 

" Smooth rutt the waters -where the brook is deep." 




i. Nickname 

2. Pet expression 

3. Ideal 



"Sally" 
"Hooray!" 



. Charles Da?ia Gibson 
4. Antipathy 



5. Ambition 

6. Peculiarity 

7. In love with 

8. Minus 

9. Will be 
10. Supt 



. Early hours 

To be a good cook 

Coiffure 

Human kind 

Demonstrative affection 

A college girl 



Martha R. Laurens 
Gamma Tau 



38 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



Thatcher, Fannie Irene ..... Bennington, Vt. 

" Childish, sweet, and woman wise." 




i. Nickname 

2. Pet expression 



"Fan" 



"Cu-tie" 

3. Ideal 

An authority on Parlia- 
me7itary Law 

4. Antipathy 

Strikes 

5. Ambition 

To sing 

6. Peculiarity 

. Getting lessons done ahead 



7. In love with 

8. Minus 

9. Will be 
10. Supe 



"Mickie" 

Evelyn Lapowski 

Missionary 

. Bess Bacon 



Lasellia 

President of Christian 

Endeavor Society 
Speaker of Lasell Congress 



39 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



Turner, Dorothea Louise ...... Rutland, Vt. 

"^4 manner so plain, unaffected, and sincere.'''' 




i. Nickname 



"Dodo" 



2. Pet expression 

"Popper says so" 

3. Ideal 

. Any resident of Montague 



4. Antipathy 



Work 



5. Ambition 

. To be a farmer s -wife 



6. Peculiarity 

7. In love with 

8. Minus 

9. Will be 



Strength of voice 



The moon 



Courage 



10. Supe 



Helen Heath 
Gamma Tau 



40 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



Washburn, Katharine Cheney .... Melrose, Mass. 

" Clever, but not conceited'''' (?) 




i. Nickname 



'Kathie" 



2. Pet expression 

"/ dorit -wish you any evil, 
but I hope you choke" 

3. Ideal 

. A Philadelphia u 

4. Antipathy 

Railroad rates to Pennsyl- 
vania 

5. Ambition 

To become a great singer 



6. Peculiarity 



Te?ide?icy to holt on 



7. In love with 



8. Minus 



Her class president 



Pain 



9. Will be 

. Mine. S'cmbricA's successor 



10. Supe 



Grace Louise Vicary 

La SET. LI A 



4 1 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



Wilson, Lucy Gray ...... Washington, la. 

'■'■And talked with measured, emphasized reserve." 




i. Nickname 



"Lucy Gray' 



2. Pet expression 

. "Ok, my goodness ! " 



3. Ideal 



A slight person 



4. Antipathy 

Long-sleeved dresses 

5. Ambition 

To live half the time in 

IVashingtofi and half in 

Chicago 

6. Peculiarity 

Non-talkativeness 



7. In love with 



8. Minus 



A freshman (two) 



. Gift of gab 



9. Will be 



10. Supe 



Nice, stout matron 

Clara Huttenbauer 
S. D. 



r- 



THE ALLERLEI 



GRADUATES 



Young, Elsie Agnes 



" I thus neglected worldly ends, all dedicated 
To closeness and the bettering of my mind." 




i. Nickname 

\_Not in accordance -with 
Senior dignity~\ 
2. Pet expression 

" Give me time 



3. Ideal 

4. Antipathy 

5. Ambition 

6. Peculiarity 

7. In love with 

8. Minus 

9. Will be 
10. Supe 



Dignity personified 

Frivolity 

To be a teacher 

Blushing 

Edward 

Optimism 

Married sometime 



Etta May Thayer 
Gamma Tau 



43 



THE ALLERLEI SENIOR HISTORY 



Senior History 

The Gypsy Oracle and the Class of '06 

Scene : A gypsy camp in a beautiful wood. 

Characters : A gypsy fortune teller. 

A little golden-haired girl, Mary. 
Mother of the child. 

Mary and her mother wandering through a wood, find themselves within a gypsy camp 
surrounded by gypsies, one of whom is anxious to tell the child's fortune. 

Mary : O mother, what funny people ! What can they want ? 

Mother : Only to tell you what you are going to do when you are a 
big girl. Would you like to have them? 

Mary : Oh, let's ! It would be great fun to know where I am going 
to school, and all about it. 

(Mother signs to gypsy to proceed.) 

Gypsy (looking earnestly into child's hand) : The little lady is still 
very young, but will soon go away to a school far from here — to Lasell. 
(Gazing into Mary's blue eyes) You will be the first to enter of a class 
which will prove the largest in the history of the school, — the Class of '06. 
Entering as Preparatory, you will pass successively into the Freshman, 

44 



THE ALLERLEI SENIOR HISTORY 

Sophomore, and Junior grades, and, as a Junior, will battle with the 
Seniors, the powerful class foe, though at the proper time loyally devoted 
to your own especial and well-beloved Senior. 

Mary: Oh, shall /ever be a Senior! Please tell me all about my 
Senior year. That will be the grandest of all ! 

Gypsy : On the opening of Lasell in '05 twenty-eight of your old 
friends, and three new girls, will join hands to form the strong and splen- 
did Senior Class of 1906. 

Mary : And what next ? 

Gypsy : Very soon after your return your band will gather to elect 
officers, and all will be done so quickly and quietly that no one will guess 
next day that you are already a fully organized and finally officered Senior 
Class. 

Mary : And our caps and gowns ? 

Gypsy : On the twenty-fifth of October I see numerous boxes, all of 
one size, anxiously smuggled into Senior Hall, where they are jealously 
guarded, even being kept under lock and key ; yet not a vestige of telltale 
expression is to be seen on a Senior's face, for the sharp-eyed Juniors are 
on watch. For a whole night and a day these treasures are not worn. At 
dinner the Juniors in white, all expectancy, buzz, " Here come the caps 
and gowns ! " But no ; here are the Seniors in citizen's dress, and wearing 
the most unconcerned looks imaginable ! " When will they appear? " think 
the bewildered Juniors. 

Mary : And when will they ? 

Gypsy : At the appointed time. After everyone has seated herself for 
lecture, your class, wearing the long-dreamed-of caps and gowns, will form 
in two rows, one on each side of the chapel door, to greet Dr. Vincent, 
your honorary member, who will lecture that evening. Your entrance may 

45 



THE ALLERLEI SENIOR HISTORY 

not cause the great stir among the Juniors that you perhaps will have 
expected, but this will be due only to their surprise and bewilderment at 
your sudden and unexpected appearance. 

Mary : Oh, won't that be fine ! 

Gypsy : Your newly acquired treasures will remain under lock and 
key until the following Saturday evening, when you will christen Senior 
Hall. Your president, surrounded by her classmates on the porch of Senior 
Hall, will christen it " Karandon House," the foster child of Mrs. Kath- 
erine Ransom Bragdon. Then clear and strong on the still night air will 
echo your rousing cheers for Karandon House, and for each class ; and 
in return the cheers of the other classes for the Seniors and for their class 
home. 

Mary : Please go on ! I'm so interested. 

Gypsy : Before you know it, January twenty-seventh, the day of your 
"At Home" for the Juniors, will have come. I can see just how pretty 
everything will look ; and those refreshments — I wish I had a taste of them 
now ! And think, you will be there to enjoy all these goodies ! 

Mary : And what else ? 

Gypsy : I can see nothing more. Ah, yes I do. I see you, during the 
long winter term, struggling with what you had expected to be such a bug- 
bear, — your Senior essay. But I hear, also, a sigh of relief when it is copied 
and laid away, even before Easter vacation, leaving you during the last 
term free to make the most of your few closing weeks of school. 

Mary : And is that all ? 

Gypsy : Not quite. I see you again on Commencement day, diploma 
in hand, bravely trying to smile through your tears, for the time has come 
to bid farewell to your Alma Mater, and to your many loving friends. But 
do not falter now ; there is no turning back. Be loyal to your Alma Mater, 

46 



THE ALLERLEI 



SENIOR HISTORY 



and kind and true to your classmates and friends ; endeavoring always to 
make stronger the bonds of friendship formed in your school home, and 
you will never regret the years spent at Lasell. 

Mary : Won't that be lovely ! Do you think all this will ever come 
true, mother? 

Mother : Yes, dear, very likely ; but we will wait and see. 




47 



THE ALLERLEI CLASS OF 1907 

Class of 1907 

Motto : Esse Quam Videri 
Colors : Purple and White 
Flower : Violet 

Helen Abbott Wait ..... President 

Bessie McCormick Bacon . . . Vice President 

Louise Kelly ...... Secretary 

Helen Emily Carter ..... Treasurer 

HONORARY ME.MBLR 
Theodore Roosevelt 

ME.MBLRS OF CLASS 

Atwell, Marion Mills Orono, Me. 

Bacon, Bessie McCormick York, Pa. 

Balch, Katherine Louise Marshalltown, la. 

Carter, Helen Emily Hastings, Minn. 

Chase, Alice Josephine • . . Sebec Station, Me. 

Chase, Minnie Lois Sebec Station, Me. 

Cones, Edna Lee Columbus, Ohio 

Danforth, Cora May . Yonkers, N. Y. 

Disman, Florence Helene Salida, Colo. 

Dixon, Fern Bristol, R. I. 

Douglass, Lilian Marion Buffalo, N. Y. 

Eaton, Cornelia Hitchcock Lee, Mass. 

Gunn, Marjorie Springfield, Ohio 

Handy, Etta Howes Cataumet, Mass. 

Heath, Helen Hunt Morristown, N. J. 

Huttenbauer, Clara Cincinnati, Ohio 

Johnson, Jennie Matilda Middletown, Conn. 

Judson, Bess Gould Galesburg, 111. 

Kelly, Louise Springfield, Ohio 

Lane, Florence Moulton Dorchester, Mass. 

Laurens, Martha Rutledge Charleston, S. C. 

Levi, Esther Loeb Victoria, Texas 

Masters, Mary Lightfoot Jacksonville, 111. 

Peirce, Elizabeth Brookline, Mass. 

Plant, Amy Elizabeth Newton, Mass. 

Richardson, Mary Irene . Littleton, N. H. 

Rosenthal, Helen Cincinnati, Ohio 

Sisson, Edna Anna Binghamton, N. Y. 

Sisson, Ida Cary Binghamton, N. Y. 

Stahl, Marion Belle . Bellevue, Ohio 

Strickland, Edna Helen Rockville, Conn. 

Thayer, Etta Burlington, Vt. 

Tilton, Edith May Leominster, Mass. 

Tucker, Jessie Wayne, Neb. 

Vicary, Grace Louise Canton, Ohio 

Vickery, Anne Fort Worth, Texas 

Wait, Helen Abbott Glens Falls, N. Y. 

Wilde, Ethel Perry New Bedford, Mass. 

49 



THE ALLERLEI JUNIOR HISTORY 



Junior History 

Milestones 

^^^^HIS Junior Class first made its auspicious appearance on one 
■ ** J bright September morn in 1903, and since then most of its 
^^^^^ members have climbed the Mount of Knowledge easily and with 
dispatch, until they now stand very near its summit, floating the colors of 
Dignity and Purity over the conquered territory of this Adamless Eden. 

Their battles with the combined forces of their foes — Trigonometry, 
History and Latin — were hard fought, but gave them victory ; and serene 
in the joy of possession, they now shine like stars in the firmament, and 
are quoted as models of courage, integrity and superior knowledge. Even 
the Seniors admit this, since to the wise the facts are sufficiently evident. 
So certain, indeed, from the first, were they of our wisdon, that they under- 
stood almost immediately that their assistance would not be needed in the 
selection of Junior Class officers ; and consequently, without evincing the 
slightest inclination to interfere, they left this sagacious body to manage its 
own business. That this confidence was well placed none will doubt ; for 
what more could be desired in evidence of it than our choice of a president, 
even the August One who now stands supreme in the eyes of her class- 
mates ? Demosthenes would have smiled with satisfied approval had he 
been present when she so eloquently proclaimed that the happy dwelling- 
place of the Class of '07 should henceforth be Cushman Hall. 

This election was the first great milestone of the present year. Turn 
now and look upon our next. It is our monument of victory, standing 
loftily before the faces of defeated Seniors, as they pass from their quiet, 
reposeful home to our central seat of learning on the hill. See how its 
white walls bear in pride that smiling " '07," as if welcoming its possessors 
to its protection. 

What a thrill of comfort enters the heart of our courageous class as it 
reviews the long march it has made since the time of its enlistment as a 
Freshman Class, during which year, despite sneers and significant glances, 
it not only fought sturdily for itself and its own rights, but graciously aided 
the suffering Juniors in their hour of need, — and doughty defenders and 

50 



THE ALLERLEI JUNIOR HISTORY 

trusty sentinels they made. With such a record to steady it onward, it 
went to the unknown dangers of Sophomore year, when it carefully guarded 
Post 6 one eventful night against the intrigues of uninvited and unwelcome 
Juniors. This was yet another milestone. Then, again, on the first bright 
day of May all extended to this noble little army enthusiastic thanks for the 
beautiful decoration in honor of the Queen of May. By this time various 
misfortunes had taken off several of the original little band, yet those left 
were as stanch and true as ever ; and with a few new recruits the class 
entered upon its Junior year, the Deer House presaging at the very outset 
its triumphant future. 

One milestone more, — a glowing rose this time. It is not alone in 
" crossing the Delaware" that heroism may show itself or that pride may 
be engendered. To make this class proud of itself it required, on one 
occasion, only a short, brisk walk from Cushman Hall to Karandon House, 
where, stately and serene, the Seniors welcomed the jolly Juniors one Sat- 
urday evening in January. How prompt we were, and with what ease we 
passed down the long line of receiving hostesses, never once faltering for 
lack of something to say ! If the sparkling chat turned on art, the artists of 
'07 proudly took the lead ; if the theme was music, it was evident that the 
fair goddess of that gift had not given stingily when distributing her treas- 
ure ; if it was poetry, our grounding in that noble art could not be sur- 
passed ; and in discussing the painters, who so glib of tongue? Law-abiding 
citizens we are ; and all took particular pride in returning home and going 
sedately to bed before the time for the compelling knock of warning that 
the nine-thirty bell had given its command, " Lights out." 

So, then, farewell for a time, dear Junior Class. You may well be 
proud of your genius and your ambitions. Continue to guard well that 
charge upon the hill, and remember that the extreme summit is yet to be 



gained. 



YE.LLS 

Theo, Theum, The-od-o-re, 
Doree, Dorum, Skerim, Skeree, 
Skeree, Skerorum, Divvy, Devven, 

We yell I We yell! For Oughty-Sevenl 

Boomalacka, Boomalacka, Bow-wow-wow, 
Chickalacka, Chickalacka, Chow. Chow, Chow! 
Boomalacka, Chickalacka ! Hear us roar 
Junior! Junior! Junio-o-or ! 

5i 



THE ALLERLE1 



CLASS OF 1908 



Class of 1908 



Color : Dark Blue 
Flower : White Carn 

Edna Lois Thurston 
Charlotte Pierce Rydjer 
Helen Lela Goodall . 
Amy Joskimiine Bkmis . 
Florence Dkk Stark . 

MEMBERS OF CLASS 
Argue, Pearle Ethel 
Blaisdell, Lois Sarah 
Blakestad, [mo Dell 
Blyth, Isabella Carmichael 
Bragdon, Gertrude 
Bullard, Agnes Ethel . 
Eaton, Mary Margaretta 
Griswold, Grace Thomas 
Hobbs, Alice Dunklin 
Hotchkiss, Alcine Webster . 
House, Elizabeth Burgess 
Howald, Marie Elizabeth 
Marshall, Charlotte Jkssik 
Milleisen, Sara Barbara 
Morrell, Louise Willett 
Nims, Clara Felt . 

PURINGTON, I I ELEN . 

Reilly, Lucy Eugenia 
StrAtton, Helen Inez 
Taft, Ethel .... 
Wilmarth, Mary De Wolfe . 



ition 



President 
Vice President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Historian 

Toledo, Ohio 

. York Village, Me. 

. Chicago, 111. 

Evariston, Wyo. 

Bayonne, N. J. 

Caryville, Mass. 

. Montowese, Conn. 

Providence, R. I. 

Aurora, 111. 

Ansonia, Conn. 

. New York, N. Y. 

Hamilton, Ohio 

Worcester, Mass. 

Bloomsburg, Pa. 

Passaie, N. J. 

. Watertown, N. Y. 

(Jalesburg, 111. 

Gleasondale, Mass. 

I [udson, Mass. 

. Cedar Rapids, la. 

. Glens Falls, N. Y. 



52 



THE ALLERLEI SOPHOMORE CLASS HISTORY 




Sophomore Class History 

OPHOMORES ! You start at that name, having known us for 
half a school year, and having borne witness repeatedly to our 
mighty deeds. This is the only word to use, and those who saw 
our first class meeting know that anything less than "mighty" would not 
rightly describe the way in which the intruding Juniors were on that occa- 
sion expelled. To be sure, it was a long wait before the last intruder was 
done away with, but our Thurst(on) for victory helped us to conquer in 
the end. We confess, however, that it was largely our Seniors that we 
had to thank, because for all our strength, we needed the encouragement 
of those friends in need to cheer us on and help when the pinch came. 

Our second coming together was at the christening of the school 
buildings. We gave our cheers on each occasion, and thus again showed 
our might in strength of voice and in class spirit. That night, too, our 
president covered herself and her class with glory by delivering a speech 
and christening Potter Hall. 

But the most exciting of our experiences, as all will agree, came on 
the day when the Seniors were first to appear in caps and gowns. Various 
Sophs took turns then in carefully guarding the sacred closet in which the 
precious articles were locked. How proud we were of the stately band 
when they marched into chapel after all the rest of us had taken our seats; 
and how our hearts glowed as we stood and clapped and clapped, until our 
hands actually ached (doing, by the way, a good share of the clapping for 
the Juniors, as they seemed curiously disinclined to do it themselves that 
evening). Then we noted how becoming this academic attire was to 
various girls of the class, and felt that our careful guarding had not been 
in vain. 

53 



THE ALLERLEI SOPHOMORE CLASS HISTORY 

As to the girls of the Class of 1908, no better could be found; they 
all believe in "Woman for the Home," and if you should ask, you would 
find very few who would say that they would rather Be-mis than be Mrs. 
We are also a very congenial set ; there is nothing Reilly about us. Our 
Morrells are excellent, and our health is a marvel. We have Eaton Bacon 
and eggs, turkey, and ice cream devotedly, and these give strength and pre- 
serve youth in all. The oldest of us looks positively young, so that no one 
is able to guess Howald any one of us really is. In short, we are Good- 
all around. 

Many of our numbers have joined us since school began ; of course 
they know the proper thing to do, and they are very wise. We hope we 
may still add to our numbers as time goes on, and that when 1908 actually 
arrives, we may be as large and fine a class as is our Senior Class of 1906. 

YLLL 

S-o-p-h-o-m-o-r-e-s ! 

Sophomores ! Sophomores ! 

igo8 ! 



54 






Class of 1909 



Motto : Perseverance to the End 
Colors : Green and White 
Flower : White Rose 



Helen Whittier Andrus 
Gertrude Leonard 
Josephine Weare Fish 
Yolande Morrison 
Yoi.ande Morrison 



ME.MBLR5 OF CLASS 

Conant, Anna Louise 

Kennedy, Maude Leocadia 

Lovitt, Madeleine Evelina Beveridge 

Paisley, Louise Ballentine . 

Rogers, Florence Madeline 

Spear, Pauline Minette 

Steinmetz, Caroline Kraemer 

Swett, Katharine Healy 

Wheaton, Edna Keen 

Wilson, Louise Anita 

Wilson, Martha Edna . 

Woodbury, Mildred Dorothy 



President 
Vice President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Historian 



. Plainfield, N. J. 

West New Brighton, N. Y. 

Yarmouth, Nova Scotia 

. New York, N. Y. 

Greenville, Me. 

. New York, N. Y. 

. Reading, Pa. 

Southern Pines, N. C. 

New Bedford, Mass. 

Joliet, 111. 

Joliet, 111. 

Burlington, Vt. 



55 



THE ALLERLEI FRESHMAN REMINISCENCES 



Freshman Reminiscences 

Conant, Rogers, Morrison, Spear, 

Leonard, Kennedy, Steinmetz, Fish, 
Paisley, Wheaton, Woodbury, Swett, — 

Better girls you could never wish. 

Distinct and clear each member stands out as we call the roll of our 
class, and with remarkable loyalty and pride do they hear the banner of 
1909. 

One of the most noticeable things about us from the very first birth- 
day of the class has been our superiority. This appeared especially in our 
promptness in organizing. There was no delay in calling us together for 
a meeting. But although this had been arranged, as we thought, in all 
secrecy, we had not been forgotten by our enemies, the Sophomores, who 
so far lost sight of their maidenly dignity as to stand on chairs in order to 
look through the transom upon us at our election, but who, upon hearing 
"half-past nine" footsteps, fled ingloriously. This episode had disturbed 
us somewhat, and on the departure of the foe the meeting had once more 
to be called to order; and now began business in good earnest. It seemed 
very, very difficult to choose officers from such a brilliant and capable 
assemblage. For any other class it would have been impossible to over- 
come this difficulty, but in a very short time our remarkable thirteen had 
conquered it, and the class of 1909 was organized. 

After this first class meeting, by our co-operation in all things, and 
particularly by our individual brightness in our classes, we excited a great 
deal of wonderment and admiration. The Seniors, incredible as it may 
seem, were accustomed to say, as they saw different members of our class 
pass by, "If only the Juniors and Sophomores can keep up the dignity 
and scholarship for the next two years, we need not worry about the third." 
The Juniors, always our friends, plainly showed their delight and pleasure 
in our society. It does seem strange, but very fortunate, too, that such 
girls as we, at once brainy and modest, should belong to a freshman class. 
But we remember that we are on our way to Seniorhood ; this is but an 
"intermediate stage." Will Lasell be able to hold us in 1909? 

YLLL 

Boom-chlck-a, Boom-cJiick-a 

Boom, Boom, Boom! 
Hockev-pockey-sis-rah-room, 
Razzle-dazzle-sitperjiiie 
Is the Class of Oitghty-nine. 

56 





fjr 


fe) « 


•I" ^C 


(MtyNfl 



Preparatory 



Blackstock, Esther Duncan 
Brannan, Amy Florence 
Hakdinge, Arline Bertha 
Jackson, Helen Marie . 
Knight, Julia Estelle . 
Leavttt, Helen Ela 
McCarty, Louise Alice 
Pautot, Lillian Frances 
Percy, Carmen Millicent VV 
Reinherz, Cora Sylvia . 



\siiiu : i;n 



Shahjahanpore, India 

Cleveland, Ohio 

. New York, N. Y. 

Brookline, Mass. 

Rockville Centre, L. I. 

. Cambridge, Mass. 

. Williamsport, Pa. 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Oakland, Cal. 

Roxbury, Mass. 



57 



THE ALLERLEI 



SPECIALS 



Specials 

Abrams, Jessie Ladd 
Adler, Berenice 
Albright, Nellie Virginia 
Boyce, Ella Florence . 
Brock, Phyllis Azile 
Caldwell, Dorothy Grace 
Carleton, Marjorie Babbidge 
Carlow, Ina Eulalia 
Child, Florence Elizabeth 
Davenport, May Eberle 
Dyer, Nellie Bradford 
Fassett, Katherine Margaret 
Fengar, Elsie Clay 
Freuler, Grace Amelia 
Halberstadt, Madelene Taws 
Halsey, Lyllis 
Hartman, Frances Miriam 
Hovey, Florence Anna 
Huntington, Helen 
Inglis, Bertha 
Irwin, Julia Coleman 
June, Mabel Ethelda 
Kempner, Fannie 
Luce, Flora Marion 
McCorkindale, Ethel Lillian 
Meyer, Helen Irene 
Moore, Felonise 
Mountain, Grace Florence 
Orcutt, Hazel Best 
Parker, Anna Frances . 
Parker, Esther Maria . 
Porter, Mary Winifred 
Potter, Lillie Nicholl 
Puterbaugh, Mabel Law 
Radcliffe, Ethel Clemons 
Saunders, Dorothea 
Sebring, Helen Loraine 
Serviss, Florence Margaret 
Smith, Winifred Langdale 
Stefferson, Amy 
Strong, Genevra Hanmer 
Terry, Lucy Loomis 
Webb, Glenna 
Weill, Judith 
White, Anna Sophie 
Wilson, Annah Laura 
Wood, Ada Katharine 

58 



Hartford, Conn. 

. New Orleans, La. 

Orwigsburg, Pa. 

Keene, N. H. 

Melrose, Mass. 

Newtonville, Mass. 

. ' Oldtown, Me. 

. Worcester, Mass. 

St. Paul, Minn. 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

Holbrook, Mass. 

Spokane, Wash. 

New London, Conn. 

Berkeley, Cal. 

Pottsville, Pa. 

Montclair, N. J. 

Hartford, Conn. 

Detroit, Mich. 

Elizabeth, N. J. 

Paterson, N. J. 

Lafayette, Ind. 

Sheridan, Wyo. 

Galveston, Texas 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Holyoke, Mass. 

Hastings, Minn. 

Ironton, Ohio 

. Chicago, 111. 

Mechanicville, N. Y. 

. Franconia, N. H. 

. Franconia, N. H. 

Northampton, Mass. 

. Milwaukee, Wis. 

South McAlester, I. T. 

Shelton, Conn. 

New Haven, Conn. 

Sebring, Ohio 

Amsterdam, N. Y. 

New Haven, Conn. 

Memphis, Tenn. 

New Haven, Conn. 

Galesburg, 111. 

Springfield, Ohio 

. Kansas City, Mo. 

Woonsocket, R. I. 

Hudson, N. Y. 

Chestnut Hill, Mass. 




Brek/t Pint" 



THE ALLERLEI 



MEMBERS OF S. D. SOCIETY 



Members of 5. D. Society 



HONORARY MEMBLRS 



Miss Bates 
Miss Goodrich 
Miss Mulliken 



Mrs. Wixslow 



Miss Packard 
Miss Potter 
Miss Rand 



Marie Andrews 
Helen Andrus 
Imo Blakestad 
Dorothy Caldwell 
Fern Dixon 
Cornelia Eaton 
Margaret Fuller 
Lela Goodall 
Ina Harber 
Florence Hovey 
Jennie Johnson 



Clara Mattlage 
Yolande Morrison 
Mildred Peirce 
Elizabeth Peirce 
Julia Potter 
Irene Sauter 
Edna Sisson 
Ida Sisson 
Geneyra Strong 
Annah Wilson 
Lucy Wilson 



61 







Ih;l;„ I'll'"' 



THE ALLERLEI 



MEMBERS OF LASELLIA 



Members of Lasellia 



HONORARY MLMBE.RS 



Mr. Dunham 
Miss Francis 
Mr. Hills 
Mrs. Loomis 



Mrs. Martin 
Miss White 
Dr. Winslow 

Miss Witherbee 



Elizabeth Bacon 
Esther Blackstock 
Anna Blackstock 
Meta Buehner 
Annie Dealey 
Fannie Dealey 
Marie Eaton 
Katharine Fassett 
Grace Freuler 
Gertrude Graham 
Marjorie Gunn 



Madelin Halberstadt 
Helen Huntington 
Belle Johnson 
Mildred Johnston 
Louise Kelly 
Katharine McClanahan 
Louise Morrell 
Maude Simes 
Fannie Thatcher 
Katharine Washburn 
Glenna Webb 



Ada Wood 



63 




5«u(iW»bo Co Bo 



THE ALLERLEI 



DELTA 



Delta 



HONORARY ME.MBE.R5 



Colonel Sprague 
Miss Parkhurst 



Miss Lowell 
Miss Dunsford 



Amy Bemis 
Margarita Buehner 
Sarah Caldwell 
Ina Carlow 
Helen E. Carter 
Helen F. Carter 
Cora Danforth 
Bess Judson 
Mabel June 
Fannie Kempner 



Gertrude Leonard 
Mary Masters 
Mabel Puterbaugh 
Helen Sebring 
Marion Stahl 
Florence Stark 
Ethel Taft 
Lucy Terry 
Edna Thurston 
Helen Wait 



65 




samuei- w*wxj tio.~B.ns-r a n. 



THE ALLERLEI 



GAMMA TAU 



Gamma Tau 

HONORARY MLMBLR 
Fraulein Heinrich 



Marion Atwell 
Florence Boyce 
Ruth Butterfield 
Marjorie Carlton 
Nellie Dyer 
Grace Griswold 
Etta Handy 
Bertha Inglis 
Martha Laurens 
Charlotte Marshall 
Ruth Marston 
Louise McCarthy 
Hazel Orcutt 



Amy Plant 
Ethel Radcliefe 
Lucy Reilly 
Mary Richardson 
Florence Rogers 
Charlotte Ryder 
Florence Seryiss 
Sarah Strong 
Katherine Swett 
Etta Thayer 
Dorothea Turner 
Grace Vicary 
Elsie Young 



67 




Masquers 



Mildred Johnston 
Edna Lois Thurston 



Marie Andrews 
Ethel Argue 
Meta Buehner 
Dorothy Caldwell 
Edna Cones 



MEMBERS 



13/isiuess Manager 
Secretary 



Fern Dixon 
Ina Harbor 
Elizabeth Peirce 
Mildred Peirce 
Marion Stahl 



Anne Vickery 
69 



THE ALLERLEI 



SOCIETIES 



Missionary Society 

Maude Simes ......... President 

Sarah Caldwell ....... Vice President 

Louise Kellv ......... Secretary 

Martha Laurens ........ Treasurer 

Miss Packard \ 

Helen F. Carter > ..... Executive Committee 

Julia Potter ) 

Dr. G. M. Winslow Auditor 



-It 



Christian Lndeavor Society 



Fanny Thatcher 
Annie Dealey 
Julia Potter . 



President 

lice President 

Secretary and Treasurer 




Mandolin Club 

LLADLR 
Edna Sisson 



Helen Andrus 
Elizabeth Bacon 

Miss Bates 



Dorothea Saunders 
Ethel Wilde 
Lucy Wilson 



PIANO 
Amy Be mis 



73 




In a Carlo w 
Florence Child 



Glee Club 



FIR5T SOPRANO 



Miss Bates 



Helen Huntington 
Glenna Webb 



Bella Blyth 
Mary Wilmarth 



5LCOND SOPRANO 



Margarita Buehner 
Dorothy Saunders 



Mildred Peirce 
Dorothy Caldwell 



FIR5T ALTO 



Katharine Fassett 
Elizabp:th House 



Edna Cones 



5E.COND ALTO 



Phyllis Brock 



vi m 




THE ALLERLEI 



ORPHEAN 



Ina Carlow 
Alice Chase 
Cora Danforth 
Helen Huntington 
Belle Johnson 
Sara Milleisen 

Nellie Albright 
Lois Blaisdell 
Dorothy Caldwell 
Minnie Chase 
Florence Child 
Ina Harbor 
Clara Huttenbauer 
Elizabeth House 

Plyllis Brock 
Edna Cones 
Marjorie Gunn 



Orphean 



FIRST SOPRANO 



5E.COND SOPRANO 



CONTRALTO 



Amy Plant 
Ethel Radcliffe 
Genevra Strong 
Edith Tilton 
Dorothea Turner 
Glenna Webb 

Jennie Johnson 
Maude Kennedy 
Martha Laurens 
Florence Lane 
Charlotte Marshall 
Mildred Peirce 
Mary Porter 
Florence Serviss 

Marie Howald 
Felonise Moore 
Anna Parker 



Katharine Swett 



76 



THE ALLERLEI 



LASELL LEAVES ASSOCIATION 



Lasell Leaves Association 



FIR5T TE.RM 



Kathryne McClanahan 
Annie Dealey 
Met a Buehner 
Lucy Wilson . 
Helen E. Carter 
Fanny Thatcher 
Margarita Buehner 
Edith Anthony 
Helen Wait 
Cora Danforth 



Editor in Chief 

. Associate Editor 

Local Editor 

. Exchange Editor 

Subscription Agent 

Business Manager 

President 

Vice Preside7it 

Secretary 

Auditor 



SLCOND TLRM 



Kathryne McClanahan 
Vera Butler > 
Corinne Krag \ 
Mildred Peirce 
Cora Danforth 
Anne Vickery 
Fanny Thatcher 
Marie Andrews 
Katharine Washburn 
Ina Harber 
Louise Kelly . 



Editor in Chief 

Associate Editors 

Local Editor 

Exchange Editor 

Subscription Agent 

Business Manager 

Preside??t 

Vice President 

Secretary 

Auditor 



THIRD TLRM 



Martha Laurens 
Marion Atwell ) 
Florence Disman ) 
Helen E. Carter 
Ethel Wilde . 
Grace Vicary 
Fanny Thatcher 
Jennie Johnson 
Helen Wait 
Edna Cones 
Louise Morrell 



Editor in Chief 

Associate Editors 

L.ocal Editor 

Exchange Editor 

Subscription Agent 

Business Manager 

President 

Vice President 

Secretary 

Auditor 



it 




Gertrude Leonard 
Mabel Puterbaugh 
Carrie Steinmetz 



Helen Emily Carter 
Captain Co. A 



Lieutenant 

First Sergeant 

Second Sergeant 




Edna Lois Thurston 
Captain Co. B 



Mary Masters 
Lela Goodall 
Ethel Wilde . 



Lieutenant 

First Sergeant 

Second Sergeant 



THE ALLERLEI 



WHO'S WHO? 



Most popular 



Most fascinating- 



Most talented 



Who's Who? 



: 



Maude Simes 
Edna Thurston 



I Glenna Webb 
( Mildred Peirce 

Helen Huntington 
Martha R. Laurens 



Most respected 
Most lovable 



Best looking 



Best dresser 



Best dancer 



Brightest 



Wittiest 



( 



I 



I 



Maude Simes 

Fern Dixon 
Helen Wait 

Helen Jackson 
Glenna Webb 

Margarita Buehner 
Marion Stahl 

Marie Howald 
Clara Mattlage 

Martha R. Laurens 
Helen F. Carter 

Mildred Peirce 
Marie Andrews 



So 




Abr-ms : Our volunteer society reformer. 

Al-br-ght : Bitter-sweet. 

An-r-s : A hard striker. 

Arg— : Star elocutionist of Junior Lit. 

Atw-ll : The maid's favorite. 

B-c-n : The professional borrower. 

B-lch : Seen, but not heard. 

B-m-s : Either stitching or studying. 

Bl— sd-ll : French is such a snap. 

Bl-ckst-ck : All noises are not singing. 

Bl-k-st— d : The professional hairdresser. 

Bl-th- : Spare time given to ragtime singing. 

B-ye- : The man hater. 

Br-gd-n : Seen, but not heard. 

Br-nn-n : Large bows, but few. beaux. 

B-ll-rd : Comin' and goin', mornin' and evenin'. 

C-ldw-ll : Blessed with that convenient utility — a brother. 

C-rl-w : Short, but sweet. 

C-rl-t-n : Of Delineatorial aspect. 

C-rt-r : N. B. — French students. 

Ch-s-, A. ) Speaks French like a native. 

Ch-s-, M. ) Never needs to consult a dictionary. 

Ch-ld : Cross her palm, and she'll tell your fortune. 



81 



THE ALLERLEI ABBREVIATIONS 

C-n-nt : All sorts and conditions of coiffure. 
C-N-s : Forget it — your drawl. 
D-nf-rth : White as a lily. 
D-sm-n : Little, but oh, my ! 
D-x-n : A true disciple of Miss Call's. 
D— gl-s : Latin a specialty. 
D-v-np-rt : The smile that won't come off. 
E-t-n, C. : Has discarded her bows but not her beaux. 
E-t-n, M. : So young and yet so tall ! 
F-ss-tt : Automatic nightingale. 
F-ng-r : When 1 was abroad. 
F-sh : The early bird. 
Fr-l-r : Denies that she is a Unionist. 
G—d-ll : Fruitarian. 
Gr-sw-ld : The silent partner. 

G-nn : Very skillful in the handling of herself in drill. 
H-lb-rst-dt : Any mail from Pottsville ? 
H-ls-y : Hast thee lost thy tongue? 
H-ndy : Synonymous with her name. 
H-rd-ng- : Our globe trotter. 

H-rtm-nn : Why so enamoured of thy reflection ? 
H--th : The favorite of Faculty. 
H-bbs : Animated question mark. 
H-tchk-ss : Grandpapa's girlie. 
H~s : What must her stationery bill be ? 
H-w-ld : A rare specimen — loves to writes essays. 
H-v-y : Her sigh is like a mighty wind. 
H-nt-ngt-n : Born to lead !( ?) 
H-tt-nb — r : Wants her money's worth. 
Ingl-s : Variety in roommates is the spice of life. 
Irw-n : Has she lost her voice ? 
J-cks-n : Handsome is as handsome does. 
J-hns-n : The florist's sole support. 
T-ds-n : She's going home to-morrow. 
J-n- : If I had the time. 
K-lly : Wants a cracker. 

82 



THE ALLERLEI ABBREVIATIONS 

K-mpn-r : Brown-eyed beauty, the pet of the school. 

K-nn-dy : A different strike every hour. 

Kn-ght : Second best striker. 

L-n- : Dolmetch. 

L— r-ns : Talks Ali.erlei in her sleep. 

L— v-tt : The wonderful things of home. 

L-v- : Would I were in K. C. ! 

L-v-tt : Sfie's not an American. 

L-c- : Scared out of a year's growth. 

M-rsh-ll : Leader of No. 22 Orchestra. 

M-st-rs : The dear doctor. 

McC-rty : Do you like olives? 

McC-rk-nd-l- : Are not vacations long enough ? 

M-ll—s-n : Good example of concentration. 

M-Y-R : If there is to be a trip, count on me. 

M--R- : What's in a name? Philistine and Felonise sound alike to me. 

M-rr-s-n : Mrs. Martin's Dimples. 

M-rr-ll : Rock-a-bye, baby. 

M— nt— n : Why so pensive ? 

N-ms : Never ask why. 

Orc-tt : Why so diligent in studying bookkeeping? 

P— sl-y : They don't do that way in New York. 

P— t-t : The surprise package. 

P-rk-r, A. : She could sing the savageness out of a bear. 

P-rk-r, E. : Why so timid? 

P-rcy : Learn to steer before you slide. 

Pl-nt : Our absent member. 

P-rt-r : She wants her ma. 

P-tt-r, L. : Please note "busy" signs. 

P-r-ngt-n : Possessed of convenient friends and relatives. 

P-t-rb-gh : Sleeps with her French book under her pillow. 

R-dcl-ff : Mademoiselle's pet. 

R— lly : Assistant Latin teacher. 

R— nh-rz : A precocious youngster. 

R-ch-rds-n : A large repertoire of repartee. 

R-g-rs : Appearance of hair chief concern. 

83 



THE ALLERLE1 AHHRKVIATIONS 

U-s-n ti-i-l : Wliy so tight with your knowledge? 

R-d-r : An "awful handsome" girl. 

S—nd-rs : LaselFs famous acrobat. 

S— br-ng : They didn't do such things ;it Harcourt. 

S-kv-ss: Homesick for Julia. 

S-ss-n, E. ) ,.,. ., 

,1 nev really are twins. 

S-SS-N, 1. ) J "* 

vSm-'iii : Little things count. 

Si -in.: Has many a time come near buying the florist out. 

St-rk : Never be fickle, my child. 

Sp—h : The girl who likes to Laugh. 

Sth-tt-n : Monday is her only working day. 

Str-NG : What would your mother think? 

St-m-ks-n : The invalid. 

St--nm-tz : Needs a tonic. 

S TR-CKL-ND : Conciseness, a strong point. 

Su-tt : Smile, for the postmark is Norwich. 

T-KT : Plan of life scheduled for four years. 

T-RRY : .Step aisy there ! 

Th-Y-R : Why hear the world on your shoulders? 

Tii-usT-N : In a continual state of recuperation. 

T-i.t-n : Is it Louis XIV or XVI? 

T-ck-r : Trippingly on the toe. 

V-C-RY : Talks so fast you can't understand her. 

V-ck-ry : Fuzzy el Fengar. 

W--t : fust one more helping, please. 

W-mt : The sailor girl. 

W--LL : She speaks soprano. 

W11--T-N : Strangers should beware of her innocent appearance. 

VV-i.D- : lias a fondness for sweeping on Monday. 

W-lm-rti] : Singing makes her eyes gaze heavenward. 

W-i.s-n : She knows, 'cause her father is a doctor. 

W-i.s-n, Anita: That ravenous appetite ! 

W — i) : Is she ever anything hut tl Busy"? 

W— db-ry : Take a rest cure in Boston oxer Sunday. 

Wi-i-t- : .Sweet simplicity. 

Am.-u : Better late than never. 



THE ALLERLEI GOOD SHIP •■ LASELL PUPIL" 



Wouldst Know the Adventuresome Cruise 



OF THE. 



Good 5hip, "Lasell Pupil" 



7.00. — Appointed hour to leave port. 

7.17. — Leaves port. 

7-3-&f« — Makes stop at Dining Room Landing, where good supply of 
provisions is laid in. 

S.oo. — Bearings lost ; ship wanders aimlessly until the ringing of a hell buoy 
puts her on the right course. 

S.30. — The calm that precedes a storm. 

8.35. — Terrific tempest off coast of Gymnasium. Ship wildly tossed upon 
the waves. Calm and storm alternate, until finally wind and 
wave die down, and the sea is once more quiet. 

S.50. — Fair sailing, hroken occasionally by temporary squalls or dead 
calms. 

1 2.00. — Provisions failing. 

1 2. 10. — Great excitement on hoard ; ship will lay in at next port and re-stock 
provision hold. 

12.15. — N° time to he lost; all hands on deck. 

12.45. — A- deceptive squall arises, but ship soon finds herself in dead calm, 
which lasts until 

1 .00. — When second squall announces that comparatively fair weather is 
ahead. 

85 



THE ALLERLEI GOOD SHIP " LASELL PUPIL" 

2. 20. — Captain finds it advisable to take on more provisions in case of 
emergency. 

3.00. — -Sea grows heavy at times, but for the most part currents are 
favorable. 

^.00. — Long journey ahead, therefore extensive preparations are made for 
a third stocking of provision hold. 

t^.30. — Put in at next port. Great quantities of provisions taken on. 
Much care and time taken. 

6.30. — Sea running very high. Ship heads for nearest port, but storm 
breaks upon her before this can be accomplished. She is soon 
entirely at the mercy of the waves, both propelling and steering 
apparatus useless. Anchors off the coast of Post Office till 
storm abates slightly, then heads for Port Room, but steering 
gear found to be temporarily damaged. 

7.30. — Runs aground off Study Point. Government should erect light- 
house here, else ship liable to receive crack in upper deck. 
Taking on of emergency provisions a wise forethought of 
captain's. 

9.00. — Once more on the open sea, steering for home, though much hin- 
dered by contrary wind and wave. 

9.10. — Appointed time to enter harbor bar of home port. 

9.30. — Still a few miles from harbor bar. 

9.40. — Collision with government lightship. Signal for help is blown, 
but as damages are discovered to be very slight, ship puts on 
full speed, and by 

9.41. — Is docked, much in need of repairs, though on the whole in fair 
condition. 



86 



THE ALLERLEI HARK! THE BELL! 



Hark! the Bell! 

Hear the ringing of the gong, 

Warning gong ! 
Hear the noise, the dreadful noise of its clanging song! 
How it calls, calls, calls, 
With the waking of the morn, 
While the maid goes through the halls, — 
Ah, so light her footstep falls ! 
And, a " maiden all forlorn," 
Does she strive full hard to warn ; 
Still the sleepers, tucked in tight, 
Never stir to greet the light, 
At the sounds that louder throng 
From the gong, that hateful gong, — 

Dong — ding — dong ! 
Oh, the banging and the clanging of the gong ! 

Hear the sweet-toned breakfast bell, 

Welcome bell ! 
What a world of hunger-quelling its ringing does foretell. 
From their rooms the girls flock fast; 
But one, negligent, comes last, 
Hurrying breathlessly — sad sight! 

All too late ! 
For she sees the door close tight, 
Though she hastes with all her might. — 

Sad, sad fate ! 
Oh, that she should live to tell 
Such a crime, makes tears to swell ! 

How they swell, 

How they well 
In her eyes, when she must tell 
That she " did not hear the bell," 
That welcome breakfast bell ! 

Hear the bell for study hour, — 

Irksome hour ! 
Girls go trooping to their rooms, faces sour, 
From the fun then at its height, 
When the whole world seemed so bright, 
And begin to delve in books, 
With most dignified of looks, 

So silently. 

87 



THE ALLERLEI HARK! THE BELL! 



No one dares to stir outside 
For a classmate's help to guide. 
Oh, they all have too much pride, 
Thus their faithfulness to hide ! 
With a resolute endeavor, 
Now to learn it well, or never,— 
Learn hard tasks in history, 
Or the anatomy of a flower, — 
All in one short study hour. 

Such despair ! 
How they hurry to gain all, 
Lest the goodly average fall. 
Thus they do the work with care ; 
Thus they never fall below ! 

Then by twanging, 

And by clanging, 
'Tis just nine o'clock they know, — 
'Tis the end of study hour ! 

Then the banging, 

And the clanging, 
How the noise begins again, 
With the twanging and the banging 
At the end of study hour. 

Now another bell— nine-ten ; 

Then, oh, then, 
How they scamper to their rooms 
When the bell rings at nine-ten ! 
All is silence at that time; 
For to break a rule is crime, — 
Such a thing is never done at Lasell ! 

Never ! Never ! 
Then the solemn " lights out" bell 
Sounds to bid us all good-night, — that sleepy bell. 

Punctual? Ever! 
All the rooms are dark again, 
For the long and peaceful night, at half-past nine. 

The bells, the bells! 

The warning bells ! 
We could never do without our faithful bells. 



88 



THE ALLERLEI 



WHAT 1906 THINKS OF ITSELF 



What 1906 Thinks of Itself 



Andrews 
Anthony . 

Blackstock 

BUEHNER, MaRG 

Buehner, Met A 

Butler 

butterfield 

Caldwell . 

Carter 

Cogswell . 

Dealey, A. 

Dealey, F. 

Fuller 

Graham 

Harbor 

Johnson 

Johnston . 

Krag 

Marston 

Mattlage 

McClanahan 

Peirce 

Potter 

Saute r 

Simes 

Straight 

Strong 

Thatcher 

Turner 

Washburn 

Wilson 

Young 



Most clever 
Most aristocratic 
Most smiling 
Most neatest 
Most popular 
Most picturesque 
Most bashful 
Most domestic 
Most philosophical 
Most kind hearted 
Most determined 
Most corpulent 
Most happy-go-lucky 
Most well-bread 
Most stylish 
Most musical 
Most sunny 
Most noisy 
Most quiet 

Most beautiful dancer 
Most artful 
Most chic 
Most azmtiquated 
Most sedate 
Most influential 
Most talkative 
Most unassuming 
Most parliamentary 
Most retiring 
Most traveled 
Most athletic 
Most soldierly 



89 



THE ALLERLEI O HAPPY DAY 



O Happy Day 

When 



We can find the book we're looking for in the library. 

Every girl wants to go to lecture. 

Fraulein forgets to ventilate No 3. 

The whispering stops in chapel. 

Every Senior has a house-key. 

Mrs. Martin takes us walking. 

We have ice cream and any kind of sauce. 

There's a walk from Cushman Hall to Clark Cottage. 

When the laboratory ceases to proclaim its existence to our olfactory nerves. 

Chapel lasts over-time. 

Strikes will cease. 

The rooms sweep and dust themselves. 

It storms on Sunday. 

Our laundry bags are not sent back. 

American beauties go down in price. 

We have an orchestra every night. 

We can get " a wave " for a nickel. 



-1^ 



Lxclamation Points 



Vigor of singing in chapel. 

Neat appearance of bulletin board. 

The easy passage by Post Office at 6.30 p. m. 

The torn edges of the Review of Reviews, and the neat appearance of The 

Ladies' Home Journal '. 
The rush for front seats in Shakespeare. 
The neatness of the bookrack in the hall. 

The effect of Miss Carpenter's presence on the attention in Shakespeare. 
Our unconcern at having a composer in our midst. 

90 



THE ALLERLEI "A" IS FOR ALPHABET 



"A" is for "Alphabet 



ft 



L is for Lectures by Annie P. Call ; 

If you concentrate, you'll never be nervous at all. 
A stands for Art, an absorbing studie ; 

If you wish information, consult Annie D . 

S is for Strikes which the Seniors all own ; 

Flowers are not down on the accounts sent home. 

E is for English, the dread spectre of all; 

Your conceit may be great, but is soon very small. 
L is for Letter which the mail box contains ; 

It is not the one, and at this she complains. 
L is for Learning you are supposed to acquire ; 

If its on your certificate, 'tis all you require. 

S is for Singing in chapel at noon ; 

If all would take part 'twould improve very soon. 

E is for Exams, frequent tests ( ! ) without end ; 

Explanation, just see Misses Witherbee and Rand. 

M is for Mabel, our mail girl is she, 

But packages questioned come via Miss P . 

I is for Importance, which the Soph'mores possess ; 
But all of the Juniors they mildly detest. 

N is for Nutt, who does all the nursing; 

Is it strange that when ill we all go a'nutting? 

A is for Auction, where you may buy 

Magazines for a fraction of a cent, if you try. 

R is for Rush, which the Seniors do make 

To reach their seats at the table, before 'tis too late. 

Y is for You, and we're hoping you may 

See our reason for ordering these rhj'mes in this way. 

A stands for Ads, so hard to get ; 

Just ask the agents what fate they met. 
L stands for Leaves, whose number so great, 

Is the reason the Allerlei came out so late. 
L stands for Line-cuts; not much, it is true, 

But with all due apologies we present them to you 
E stands for Editors, who, although their work 

Took labor and time, ne'er their duties did shirk. 

R stands for Rhymes ; though they might have been worse, 

We do not presume to call them good verse. 
L stands for Labor, which we don't mind a bit, 

If only we make of our book a big hit. 
E stands for Essays, not good, we're aware, 

Though on them we've expended both labor and care. 
I stands for Ignorance, displayed in these lines : 

The writer her name to give firmly declines. 

Modestly yours, 

Thewriter. 
9i 



THE ALLERLEI THE EVOLUTION OF A STRIKE 



The Lvolution of a Strike 

X WOULD wish my readers to realize that by the term strike, I 
mean, not the striker, nor the stricken one, but merely the rela- 
tion existing between these aforesaid persons. It seems to me it 
would help matters greatly, certainly considerably lessen the per- 
centage of embarrassment caused by the confusing of the two persons, if 
there were a different term for each. Instead of calling them both " strike," 
why not call one — well, I leave you to invent a term. The other day I was 
asked if I had any strikes, and I answered, " Oh, yes, several;" to which 
my interlocutor replied, " How many times a week do they give you 
flowers? I don't ever see you wearing any." My abashed reply was, 
"Why, /do all of the flower giving." 

But I diverge. In a certain school on a certain hill, one could find on 
the list of students' names these two, — Eleanor Ramsdale and Dorothy Gray. 
It is mainly with these girls that this story is concerned, so I will not trouble 
the reader with any further introductions. 

Eleanor, albeit a very attractive looking girl, was one whose deeper 
charms revealed themselves through the force of acquaintanceship ; while 
Dorothy was one of that kind to whom men, children, and animals are 
irresistibly attracted at first sight. I might have included women among 
her admirers, but I know that you would all with one accord have exclaimed, 
"Impossible!" Therefore I leave them out. Perhaps you yourselves 
will add them on reaching the finis of this tale. 

If possible, I wish that you would imagine Eleanor just a bit different 
from the majority of girls. She herself realized this, but while the differ- 
ence is to be pleasing to us, it was just the reverse to Eleanor. Yes, she 
was different, everyone in school agreed to that, even if the only things 
considered were the fascinatingly unique way in which she did her back 
hair, or the errant tilt of her retroussee nose. 

"Yes, I'm so different," Eleanor thought, complainingly. " I wonder 
why it is ? Perhaps because I have always all my life lived in a country 
village where there were no boys." 

92 



THE ALLERLEI THE EVOLUTION OF A STRIKE 

She had just come from a roomful of girls, where the subject of con- 
versation had been the ever-talked-of Bill and Bob, their wonderful exploits 
at college, and the precise way in which they began and ended their letters. 
Why is it that girls talk so much more about boys than boys about girls ? 
Perhaps because a girl gains a little prestige in a certain crowd from the 
number of correspondents among the opposite sex that she has, as also 
from the frequency with which letters from a special correspondent arrive, 
while Bob thinks no more of Bill than he did before because the latter has 
recently received a letter from Mary Jane, who is a peach of a girl, and 
began and ended her letter thusly. 

"How's your strike coming on, Dorothy?" asked one of the occu- 
pants of the room from which Eleanor had lately gone. 

"I think she's the dearest and cleverest thing in the world," replied 
this silly little minx. "Have you seen her work in the studio? Miss 
Delart considers her the most talented pupil she has had for a number of 
years." 

" Has she a brother, Dot? " 

" I don't know, and I don't care. I'm in love with her, not with a 
probable brother, and I'm going to the village in a few minutes to order 
her some flowers for to-night." 

" Dot, do you remember once that you said that though it did not in- 
fluence in any way your friendships (I should say strikeships), yet that 
your best friends among the girls were always immensely popular with the 
boys, and had hosts of friends among them. It didn't seem to me that 
Miss Ramsdale joined much in our conversation of a moment ago." This 
from that never-lacking member of a group, the green-eyed monster's 
victim. 

" Oh, probably she's very much in love, and doesn't care to talk about 
it ; or maybe she has had a romance." All of which goes to prove that 
Dorothy was wise enough to know that she herself was not very much in 
love, however much she said so. 

* ********** 

"Miss Gray, really I wish you would not send me any more flowers; 

I appreciate your doing so immensely, but still I would rather you did not. 

Good-by; I must go work in the studio now." Eleanor had said this to 

Dorothy one day soon after the arrival of the third bunch of violets. She 

93 



THE ALLERLEI THE EVOLUTION OF A STRIKE 

had thought that no ears but those for whom they were intended had heard, 
but unfortunately, or fortunately as it ultimately proved, she was mistaken, 
and her request was soon known to everyone who was in the least bit inter- 
ested in Dorothy and her strikes. 

"That strike is off, I warrant!" they exclaimed. But no; they were 
mistaken. Eleanor's unusual request had given Dorothy something to think 
about. Among all of her numberless strikes there had never yet been one 
who had asked that the extravagant supply of flowers should cease. She 
was beginning to realize that this girl who had first attracted her because of 
a certain quaintness about her dress and general appearance, and later 
because of her intelligence and talent, was very different from anyone she 
had met before. " I wonder what she thinks of me," thought Dorothy. 
***** ****** 

Eleanor had early recognized Dorothy's decided preference for her, 
but she had almost repulsed the girl's advances, because she had felt that 
they never could be friends in the true sense of the word. Dorothy was by 
far too thoughtless and frivolous. She cared for nothing so much as for 
admiration, and had scores of admirers among the girls ; but, unfortunately, 
while many tried to copy her manners, they failed miserably, because they 
lacked Dorothy's cleverness. She went with that class of girls who con- 
sidered school and its adjuncts a bore, out of which one must get as much 
fun as possible. 

As a matter of course, the news that her request to Dorothy was known 
all over the school came shortly to Eleanor's ears, and also the fact that 
her doing so was attributed to her dislike of the girl, and disapproval of 
her actions. As this was not the case, and as Eleanor's sole reason for her 
request to Dorothy was that she heartily disapproved of strikes, she sought 
in every way to strengthen her acquaintanceship with the attractive little 
creature. 

I will pass over the first few months in which their acquaintanceship 
grew to friendship, for it does not take long for two girls mutually attracted 
toward each other, however great be the incongruity of their personal dispo- 
sitions and temperaments, to become friends ; and it was not long before 
there was no subject which they did not feel free to discuss with each other. 
Strange to say, however, never once did Dorothy mention the word boy to 
Eleanor. Nevertheless, she had gradually become aware of certain facts. 

9\ 



THE ALLERLEI THE EVOLUTION OF A STRIKE 

She saw that Eleanor had no pictures of young men in her room, that none 
of her letters were addressed to men, and that as far as she could discover 
none were received from men. Naturally she had come to the conclusion 
that Eleanor had no friends among the opposite sex. She had also come 
to a wiser conclusion ; and this was, that it had been a good thing for her 
to become a sincere friend and admirer of a girl so different in every respect 
from the rest of her schoolmates, and so superior to anyone she had ever 
known before. 

*********** 

I am not going to pretend that a great change for the better came over 
Dorothy, and that she became a premature old maid. No, indeed, because 
then my story would have a moral, and that is something I hate ; it is 
always so impossible. No, the chief benefit that had come to Dorothy out 
of this, was that she had taken advantage of her opportunity to make a good 
friend. Benefit enough, too ; for when a girl who has hitherto been the 
idolized member of a group of light-headed schoolgirls, at last finds a friend, 
good hearted and sympathetic for a chum, there is certainly a gain, and a 
blessed one. 

All the gain did not come to Dorothy, either, for in the ensuing sum- 
mer Eleanor spent a month at Dorothy's beautiful home on the lake. And 
when I say that Dorothy had a brother, and you remember that Eleanor 
was very beautiful, perhaps you will agree that there were possibilities in 
the situation. Was it evolution or revolution? 



95 




Gigglers' Club 



Motto : " Laugh and the World Laughs With You " 
May Davenport, President 



Bernice Adler 
Elsie Fengar 
Julia Irwin 
Mildred Johnston 



MEMBERS 



Florence Serviss 
Winnifred Smith 
Pauline Spear 
Florence Stark 



Anita Wilson 



96 



THE ALLERLEI 



MINOR CLUBS 



Band Box Club 

Motto : k ' Neatness is Next to Godliness" 

Margarita Buehner, President 

MLMBE.R5 



Edith Anthony 
Dorothy Caldwell 
Ina Carlow 
Helen E. Carter 



Ina Harbor 
Jennie Johnson 
Maude Simes 
Florence Stark 



Glenna Webb 



Consumers' League 

Motto : " Eat, Drink, and be Merry " 

Impossible to Decide, President 

MLMBLR5 



Alice Chase 
Minnie Chase 
Florence Child 
Bess House 
Florence Hovey 
Helen Huntington 
Hazel Orcutt 



Louise Paisley 
Lucy Reilly 
Mary Richardson 
Caroline Steinmetz 
Grace Vicary 
Bab Wait 
Edna Wheaton 



Anita Wilson 

Disabled Club 

Motto : " Tho' Defeated, Their Cause was Good" 

Edna Thurston, President 

MLMBLRS 



Esther Blackstock 
Katharine McClanahan 
Cora Danforth 
May Davenport 



Julia Knight 
Carmen Percy 
Lucy Reilly 
Charlotte Ryder 



Bab Wait 



97 



THE ALLERLEI 



MINOR CLUBS 



Jess Abrams 
Sarah Caldwell 
Miss Carpenter 
Grace Freuler 



Oratory Club 



Motto : " Speak the Speech, I Pray You ' 

Miss Rand, President 

MLMBE.R5 
Helen Huntington 
Louise Kelly 
Corinne Krag 
Miss Potter 



Irene Sauter 
Sarah Strong 
Dr. Winslow 
Miss Witherbee 



May Davenport 
Helen Leavitt 
Louise McCarty 



Black-bow Club 

Motto : " The Day is Gone" 
MLMBLR5 



Inez Stratton 
Edna Wheaton 
Ethel Wilde 




98 




" Blest be the Tie that Binds " 



i Vera Butler 



2 Belle Johnson 

3 Maie Straight 

4 Sarah Milleisen 

5 Irene Sauter 

6 Jess Abrams 

7 Cora Reinherz 



8 May Davenport 

9 Florence Stark 
io Corinne Krag 

i i Grace Freuler 

12 Ada Wood 

13 Helen Huntington 



Candidates for Membership 

" Wait But a Little While in Uncomplaining Love" 
1 Marie Howald 



2 Nellie Albright 

3 Helen Leavitt 

4 Ethel Radcliffe 

5 Marion Atwell 

6 Ruth Butterfield 

7 Glenna Webb 



S Louise Kelly 

9 Mary Masters 

10 Yolande Morrison 

1 1 Bess Bacon 

12 Bess Judson 

13 Annah Wilson 



99 



THE ALLERLEI 



FITS AND MISFITS 



Fits and Misfits 



" His life was gentle, and the elements 
So mixed in him, that Nature might stand up 
And say to all the world, This was a man ! " 

" Wearing all that weight of learning 
Lightly like a flower." 

" His manner, which was soft." 

" The graceful tact, the Christian art." 

" Unto each she bowed her head, and 
Swept past with lofty tread." 

" Here is no rarity 
Of Christian charity 
Under the sun." 



" Let the world slide ; let the world go ; 
A fig for care, and a fig for woe ! " 

" A low, melodious thunder, to the sound 
Of solemn psalms and silver litanies." 

" Deep, subtle wits 
In truth are master spirits in the world." 

" What care 1, when I can lie and rest, 
Kill time, and take life at its very best." 



Dr. Bragdon 

Miss Carpenter 

Dr. Winslow 

Miss Potter 

Miss Witherbee 



Miss Packard 



Mademoiselle Le Royer 



Miss Bates 



Miss Rand 



Fraulein Heinrich 



IOO 



THE ALLERLEI 



FITS AND MISFITS 



" And when she speaks, the voice of all the gods 
Makes heaven drowsy with the harmony." 

" I know him, Horatio, a fellow of infinite jest." 

" Men of few words are the best men." 

" To love her is a liberal education." 

Miss Parkhurst 
" They are never alone that are accompanied with noble thoughts." 

Miss White 

Miss Goodrich 



Mrs. Martin 

Mr. Hills 

Mr. Dunham 



"By my troth, a pleasant spirited lady." 

" There is a gift beyond the reach of 
-Art, of being eloquently silent." 



" 'Tis fine to have a giant's strength." 



" Is she not passing fair? " 

"Yet I should so temper Justice with Mercy." 

" Fair maid, where didst thou get thy smile?" 



Miss Lowell 

Miss Frances 

Miss Dunsforth 

Allerlei Joke Editors 

Mildred Johnston 



" Her brightest conception of innocent fun 
Finds its source and its end in a side-splitting pun." 

" And still they gazed, and still the wonder grew, 
That one small head could carry all she knew." 

"My speech is deliberate, my movements slow, 
And thus always leisurely through life I will go." 



Helen E. Carter 



Marie Andrews 



" Who thinks too little and talks too much." 



Caroline Steinmetz 
Grace Griswold 



ioi 



THE ALLERLEI 



FITS AND MISFITS 



" So we grew together, like to a double cherry." 

Marion and Priss 

"If it were done, when 'tis done, then 'twere well it were done 

quickly." 

Leaving class after ten minutes, 
on faiiure of teacher to appear 

" Fresh as a flower." 

Margarita Buehner 

" Her hair was thick with many a curl that clustered 'round her 
head." 

Dorothy Caldwell 

Louise Paisley 

Ethel Taft 

* Ida Sisson 

Helen Huntington 

Lyllis Halsey 

Margaret Fuller 

Clara Nims 

Elsie Fengar 
" Contented just to know each other's near." 

Charlotte Ryder and Fannie Kempner 
" Sober as a judge." 

Lela Goodall 
" Vanity of vanities, all is vanity." 

Frances Hartman 
" I am not lean enough to be thought a good scholar." 

Carmen Percy 



" I rise with the larks." 

" Her appetite for knowledge was unsatiable." 

" Girls blush sometimes because they are alive." 

" There is no such flatterer as one's self." 

" Give thy thoughts no tongue." 

" Thy aspiring and ambitious thoughts." 

" Bashfulness is an ornament." 

" The over-curious are not over-wise." 



102 



THE ALLERLEI FITS AND MISFITS 

" Greatness knows itself." 

Corinne Krag 
" To see and to be seen." 

Flora Luce 
" Hush ! don't disturb her ; she's hunting for an idea." 

Bernice Adler 
" Your own way, } T our own say ; then you are happy." 

Cornelia Eaton 
" So wise, so young, they say, do ne'er live long." 

Cora Reinherz 
"Thou foster child of silence and slow time." 

Grace Griswold 
To Lasell Girls : — 
" Think rather of work than praise." 

" So vast is art." 

Katherine McClanahan 
" I love my love because I know my love loves me." 

Ada Wood 
" The choicest goods come in small packages." 

Ina Carlow 
" The night is in her hair." 

Clara Mattlage 
" And the shadow of a monarch's 
Crown is softened in her hair." 

Grace Vicary 
" Yet I do fear thy nature is too full of the milk of human kindness." 

Anne Vickery 
" I broke the copious curls upon my head in braids." 

Jennie Johnson 
"And munched and munched and munched." 

Helen Wait 



103 



THE ALLERLEI FRENCH A LA FRENCH TABLE 



French a la French Table 



Voulez-vous me dire les mots 

Pour pickles, gravy, chicken, crow? 

Beth, s'il vous plait, passez le sel — 

O, j'ai une histoire, I must tell. 

(O, oui, M'am'selle, je parle francais, 

Qu'est-ce que c'est le mot pour day?) 

En France, on dit pour " salt," le sel, 

This sounds exactement comme " JLaseU." 

Et, si, une fille CI can't recall 

Her name), pour poivre dit "Dana Hall," 

Clever, n'est pas, I think, don't you? 

The originator was a Ju 

M'am'selle, regarde ! Qu'est-ce que c'est 

The English lesson pour Friday? 

An essay ! Oh ! Miss Witherbee 

Will surely be the death of me. 

— Mesdemoiselles, je vous ai dit 

De ne pas parler de tout si 

II faut que vous parlez anglais — 

Pardon, j'ai ete excite. 

Que pensez-vous of this red dress? 
J'ai asked Marie. Hear what she says : 
" Your dress is very pretty, dear, 
But not the shade you ought to wear. 
If your complexion were like mine, 
You'd look so sweet, — oh, quite divine! " 
— Mees Hopkins, j'ai entendu, moi, 
Pas francais, mais des mots chinois — 
Excusez-moi, oh, s'il vous plait, 
Je n'ai tort parce que j'ai cite. 

Parlons francais, car Mademoiselle 
Will get provoked, I can always tell 
Quand elle est fache, elle — ahr — um — 
Well frowns, — I hate an idiom ! 
Mais dit, what news of Bob? Is he 
As loving as he used to be? 
How often does he write to you ? 
Without Bill's letters I'd be blue. 
— Mesdemoiselles, c'est maintenant 
La derniere fois, et pour parlant 
Anglais, il faut que vous parlez 
Francais pendant tout le dessert — 
I said she'd get provoked, oh dear! 
Oh, Mademoiselle, je suis fache, 
Mais cette fais-ci j'ai oublie. 



104 



THE ALLERLEI WHEN THE MINISTER CAME TO SUPPER 

When the Minister Came to Supper 

^^^fc^IIE morning sun shone brightly in at the window, and Emily 
■ I Amelia sat up in bed with a start. Her little clock ticking excit- 

^^^^^ edly on the bureau near by marked seven o'clock. Suddenly 
realizing the terrible lateness of the hour, the little girl jumped 
up hastily and hurried into her clothes ; that is, decorous Emily Amelia 
hurried as much as was xonsistent with her close observance of Aunt 
Lydia's favorite maxim, " Haste makes waste." Why had not she been 
called before? In her well-ordered existence she always rose exactly at 
six-thirty to the echo of Aunt Lydia's call, " Emily Amelia'! " This was 
to be such a busy, important day, too, for in the evening the new minister 
and his wife were coming to supper. When she was dressed, Emily ran 
in to Aunt Lydia's room, only to find that worthy lady in bed, with the 
shutters closed to exclude all the light. 

"Land sakes, but you're slow, child! " a voice called from the dark- 
ness. " Hustle and get Uncle Jerry a bite of breakfast. I have one of my 
terrible dizzy headaches, and can't raise my head an inch." 

Emily Amelia hurried away bewildered. Aunt Lydia sick ! It was 
unbelievable. Impatient Uncle Jerry had already gone off to work, so she 
made a cup of tea for her Aunt while pondering the situation. 

A new pastor had just been called to the Presbyterian Church of 
Waverly, and in order to give him and his wife a welcome, and an oppor- 
tunity to become acquainted with some of the prominent church members, 
various good housewives of the congregation had invited the pair to their 
homes on allotted evenings ; and there had been much pleasant rivalry 
among the women as to who should serve the most delectable repast. 
Everyone knew what a famous cook Mrs. Jeremiah Holcomb was, and it 
was conceded a matter of course that on this occasion she would outdo her- 
self. Emily Amelia knew there was no such word as "fail" in Aunt 
Lydia's vocabulary, so when she went upstairs with the tea she was not 
surprised to hear her say in a firm voice : " You probably haven't forgotten 
that to-night is our turn to entei'tain the minister. It's just impossible for 
me to get up, but I wouldn't for anything send him word not to come at 
this late hour, and put him on to some other poor, unprepared female ; so 
you just go ahead and have everything as I planned. Thank goodness I 

»o.5 



THE ALLERLEI WHEN THE MINISTER CAME TO SUPPER 

trained you up in the way you should go, — something your poor, weak 
mother could not have done, — and you really can cook. But for mercy's 
sake be careful, and don't spoil my reputation." 

Emily Amelia went downstairs with a full realization of the responsi- 
bility placed upon her — to have the dinner come up to Aunt Lydia's stand- 
ard of the best in Washington County. However, she started in bravely, 
and soon there were two delicious mince pies and two of pumpkin set 
to cool on the table. Everything went along beautifully throughout the 
busy day, and Emily Amelia began to feel an honest pride in her accom- 
plishments in the culinary line. In the afternoon she tidied up the already 
perfectly immaculate best parlor, and then put on her Sunday dress of red 
henrietta. The table had to be set with the company china, and she ven- 
tured to put her brightest flowered geranium in the center — an addition 
which Aunt Lydia would have frowned upon. Enveloped in a huge 
apron she cooked the vegetables, and by the time the guests arrived the 
house was filled with the delicious odor of fried chicken. Aunt Lydia, 
restless and tossing on the bed upstairs, kept her ears open for any sound of a 
mishap, and was continually calling down that she smelled the biscuits burning. 

Flushed with success, Emily Amelia began to serve the food, and soon 
everything was on the table in most tempting array. Only the gravy was 
lacking, and she hurried to bring in the delicious thick mixture. Alas ! 
pride always goes before a fall ; the shining kitchen floor was slippery, and 
someway, somehow, the gravy boat slid out of her hands and fell with a crash. 

"For mercy's sake, child, what's happened?" Aunt Lydia's voice 
came in distracted tones. 

But Emily Amelia, giving a little cry of pain as the hot liquid burned 
her hand, was oblivious to everything except the dreadful brown river 
flowing down her apron, and the rapidly widening lake on the immaculate 
floor, with its white islands of broken bits of china. Quickly tearing off 
her bedraggled apron, and looking to see that the precious red henrietta 
was not spotted, she began to clean up the remains of the catastrophe. 
Then Uncle Jerry, wondering at the delay, appeared on the scene to say 
that the minister was getting hungry. So Emily Amelia went in to greet 
the guests with cheeks as blazing red as the burn on her hand. 

" Really," the minister's charming young wife said, as the dinner 

progressed, "I don't see who got up this delicious dinner, with Mrs. 

Holcomb ill." 

1 06 



THE ALLERLEI WHEN THE MINISTER CAME TO SUPPER 

"Why, I did," Emily Amelia ventured, blushingly. 

" You ! " the minister's wife exclaimed in an incredulous tone. " I'm 
sure I could not do half as well myself, as John probably knows, to his 
sorrow" (with a sly glance at the minister). " Everything is just perfect." 

"Oh, no indeed," Emily Amelia protested gravely; "there isn't any 
gravy." 

Then, of course, they had to hear about the wreckage of the gravy boat, 
but the guests only thought it a grand joke, — all except the burn. So the 
evening passed delightfully away, and everyone was quite satisfied, not 
excepting Aunt Lydia, who was secretly very proud of her little niece's 
cooking. 

The next day Emily Amelia was industriously scrubbing out the grease 
spots on the kitchen floor, when she confided to her Aunt : " I know I shall 
just enjoy going to church now; the new minister is so nice. I mean," 
she added hastily, in answer to a shocked look on that lady's face, "I'll 
like it even more than I used to. The minister said," she added, slowly, 
" that he liked my cooking better than that of the modern domestic science 
teachers. Does that make me a domestic scientist? And what is one, 
anyway? " 

"Nothing but a good cook," Aunt Lydia answered shortly. "And 
don't you go and get puffed up, Emily Amelia. You must always remem- 
ber, ' The proof of the pudding is in the eating,' and just because you made 
it well once, that doesn't help you the time you spoil it." 

But Emily Amelia was dreaming about the minister's wife, and won- 
dering if she were not somewhat like her own mother, so she heard never 
a word of Aunt Lydia' s wholesome warning. 

*********** 

Through the influence of this same minister's wife, Emily Amelia was 
enabled to attend Lasell some years later, and in the cooking classes Mrs. 
Loomis had occasion to exclaim more than once, "You must have had a 
great deal of experience, Miss Holcomb, because there is scarcely anything 
I can teach you in my line of domestic science." The story of the disas- 
trous wreckage of the gravy was a most lively one to tell at feasts, when 
the tension following ghost stories had to be relieved with a laugh. Emily 
Amelia (her name was shortened to "Em" at boarding school) always 
considered the night the minister came to supper as one of the most impor- 
tant events of her childhood days. 

107 



THE ALLERLEI QUERIES 



i Queries j 

Is Florence as much of a Childe as she seems ? 
Will Bella always be Blythe ? 

Do you know how well Mary Masters her French? 
Why does our Butler not serve the Fish? 
Is Elsie as Young as she appears? 

Will a fellow sometime find in Ina a safe and pleasant Harber? 
Will Wood Ada become engaged? 
Does Louise give us a good Morrell ? 

Will not Felonise some time write something Moore after her name ? 
Why is Etta so Handy in the library ? 
Is Lela Goodall through ? 

When Charlotte has never taken lessons, how can she be such a good 
Ryder ? 

Does it not seam fitting that Miss Cutting should teach sewing? 
Does Maie always keep to the Straight and narrow way ? 
Why will Ethel Argue so much? 

Instead of patronizing Levvando's when we wish to change the color of 
clothes, why do we not apply to Nellie Dyer ? 

Why is our Knight so light and bright ? 
Ought not Pauline be able to Rowe ? 
Why are Genevra and Sally such Strong girls ? 
Is Ethel Wilde about Edna Wheaton ? 

Do you know that Katherine gets her lessons by the Swett of her brow? 
How does Glenna always entangle the hearts of unwary young men in her 
Webb ? 

Do you imagine Amy would rather Bemis than Mrs. ? 



108 




Popular Plays 



Babes in Toyland 



The West Point Cadet . 

The Music Master . 

Her Own Way . 

The Girl from Dixie 

Forty-five Minutes from Broadway 



The Strollers 



The Schoolgirl 

The Toast of the Town 

Just Out of College 

Soldiers of Fortune 

The Catch of the Season 

On the Quiet . 

The Virginian 

M'lle Modiste . 

Sunday 

Fantana . 



Mildred Johnston 

Pris Mattlage 

Cora Reinherz 

Baby Rogers 

Glenna Webb 

Belle Johnson 

Marion Stahl 

Martha Laurens 

Cora Danforth 

Bess Bacon 

Helen Sebring 

Dot Caldwell 

Bess Judson 

Amy Plant 

Maude Simes 

Class of '05 

'Class of '07 

The Signorita 

Miss Potter 

Marie Andrews 

Mary Masters 

Lillie Potter 

Fan Kempner 



109 



THE ALLERLEI 



POPULAR PLAYS 



Much Ado About Nothing 

The Girl from the Golden West 

A Pair of Spectacles 

As Ye Sow .... 

The Rollicking Girl 

The Royal Chef 

The Tempest .... 

Sergeant Brue 

The Power Behind the Throne 

The Money Makers 

The Madcap Princess 

Lovey Mary .... 

Second in Command 

The Other Girl 

The Little Minister 

Happyland .... 

As You Like It 

The Girl Who Has Everything 

She Stoops to Conquer . 

My Lady of the North . *. 

Peggy from Paris 

A Comedy of Errors 

Way Down East 

Vanity Fair .... 
I. O. U 

The Old Maids' Convention 



The Three Musketeers 



Under Southern Skies 



Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde 

When We Were Twenty-one 

In Sunny Tennessee 

The Professor's Love Story 

Dolly Dollars . 

The Wizard of Oz . 

Under the Red Rose 

Mother Goose 

Girls Will be Girls 

The Tenderfoot 



Maud Kennedy 

Carmen Percy 

Lela Goodall 

Miss Cutting 

Annah Wilson 

Sarah Caldwell 

Florence Hovky 

Bab Wait 

Miss Carpenter 

Allerlei Board 

Marie Howald 

Mary Wilmarth 

Dr. Winslow 

Lucy Terry 

Lois Blaisdell 

Anna Blackstock 

Marion Atwell 

Ina Harber 

Maie Straight 

Madeleine Lovitt 

Arline Hardinge 

Bernice Adler 

f Alice Chase 

\ Minnie Chase 

Frances Hartmann 

Helen Andrus 

Marie Cogswell 

Dorothea Turner 

Florence Mountain 

Helen E. Carter 

Edna Thurston 

Gertrude Leonard 

Esther Levi 

Annie Dealey 

Fannie Dealey 

Anne Vickery 

Josephine Fish 

Mlle. Le Royer 

Amy Stefferson 

Mrs. Winslow 

Dorothy Saunders 

Florence Child 

Jennie Johnson 

Steinie 

Margaret Fuller 

Sarah Milleisen 



iio 



THE ALLERLEI JOKES 



Jokes 



The jokes used in this Allerlei 

Are all hand-picked and new ; 
And, by the way, we're pleased to add, 

So are the chestnuts, too. 

If William Shakespeare, matchless bard, 

Were at Lasell to-day, 
Just lots of girls would try real hard 

To keep out of his way. 
This statement may seem fetched too far 

And out of season, till 
You think how many girls there are 

Who hate to meet a Bill. 

"Is there danger of contagion in a kiss?" 
Asked a young and very charming Jackson Miss. 
Said the Baltimore M.D., " If you 'wish we'll Troy, N. C. 
If there's anything contagious in a kiss." 

" Round about Auburndale " 

When the snow is on the ground, 

In a cutter he'll be found, 
Sleighing all the livelong day. 

When the dust is thick as sin, 

In a motor car he'll spin, 
Slaying all the livelong day. 

[Showing the attention paid by some girls in history class.] 

Teacher : "Who was the wife of Charles II?" 
Pupil : " The Rise of Russia." 

Teacher : " Name some of Milton's works." 

Senior (with a sudden inspiration) : " Oh ! I know. He wrote 
Dante's Inferno." 

If we three were angles, why couldn't we make a triangle? I am 
always right, you know, and you two are obtuse. 

An absent-minded Junior, probably in love, once spent much valuable 
time, and used up a great deal of nervous energy and vocal power, in 
hunting for a stamp to put on a government postal card. 

Miss C. (In Lit.) : " What is the difference between a witch-elm and 
a witch-hazel ? " 

The Senior Hall and Annex girls have a hard time in cold weather to 
keep the chaps away from their hands and lips. 

From the "Strike's" Grammar: Conjugation of the word "buss," 
" to kiss" :— 



THE ALLERLEI JOKES 



Buss : A kiss. 

Rebus : To kiss again. 

Pluribus : To kiss many times. 

Syllabus : To kiss a homely girl. 

Blunderbus : To kiss the wrong person. 

Omnibus : To kiss everybody. 

Erebus : To kiss in the dark. 

Genevra : " How do you get to Madame May's from the Old South 
Station? No, I mean the Old South Church. Oh dear! I'm all mixed 
up, but you know what I mean." 

Little Girl : " Please, have you a sheep's head?" 

Facetious Butcher : " No, my dear, only my own." 

Little Girl : "It won't do ; mother wants one with the brains in it." 

Miss Bates, to a Senior halting in her translation of Livy : "Why, 

Miss , don't you remember that word? We met with it once in 

Cassar." 

Heard in the Hall. Miss C. : "I'm full of prunes." 

Miss F. (somewhat puzzled): "Oh, did you 
have prunes at your table for luncheon?" 

Bright Senior : " The Greek women wore scandals on their feet." 
Sarcastic English Teacher : " Quite the proper place for scandals, 
Miss X." 

A gentleman speaking to a Sunday school (or it might have been 
Lasell Bible classes) asked what was meant by the " molten calf " of the 
lesson. Promptly the answer came, " It was a calf that was just shedding 
its feathers." 

There are two kinds of jokes — good jokes and the Faculty's jokes. 

In Polly Con. Miss R. : " Is health ever capital?" 

Bright Student (sub rosa) : " Not unless you have 
capital health." 

Several preps were spiritedly casting slurs upon one another, making 
uncomplimentary remarks, when a teacher gently remonstrated. 

" Oh, you mustn't mind this," spoke up one. " It's only a Woman's 
Exchange." 

Cassie (at Senior Hall) : " They have telephoned that your father 
is at the building, and wishes to see you, Miss G." (Much bustling about 
and untold excitement.) 

The Same (a few minutes later) : "I made a mistake. It's only a 
box of flowers." 

112 



THE ALLERLEI JOKES 

The clink of glasses was heard in the room. Don't be alarmed; it 
was only two affectionate spectacled roommates saying good-night. 

English Teacher : " Why do you fold your paper, Miss S. ? " 
Miss S. : " Because it is so very small." 

Miss X. : " What is that peculiar noise?" 

Miss Y. : " Oh, something has struck Ina funny, that's all. 

Miss M. : " \ did not know George Washington had two children." 
Miss N. : " He didn't; they were his wife's. She was a widower, you 
know." 

Miss Rand : " Are there any exceptions to the law of gravitation?" 
Miss A. : "A balloon." 

Miss B. : " They cut Louis XVI's neck off." 

Isn't it funny that so few chauffeurs, are Turks, though every Turk is 
an Auto man ? 

Also that the rascal who throws pepper at another may be held for 
assault? 

Miss L. (with a frtu't\ess endeavor to be witty) : " What is the differ- 
ence between forbidden unfruit and unforbidden fruit?" 

Miss Carpenter : " What is the meaning of dramatic?" 
Junior : " It means capable of being played." 

Miss Carpenter : " Golf can be played ; would you call that 
dramatic? Perhaps you would if you saw me play, however." 

Miss Rand : " When the polish coal came over, etc." 

When Maude creates the world anew 
I wonder what she's going to do. 
I hope she'll leave some room for me, 
For her I love most heartily. 
I reckon all the men will have 
Behind their names an appendage ; 
The girls will all write poetry, 
(And this I trust will admit me). 
There will be neither cone nor sphere, 
Nor pyramid nor frustum there, 
For Maude has stated very clear 
That geometry is her bugbear. 
If on this new earth you would stay, 
Just quickly learn how to " parler." 

"3 



THE ALLERLEI JOKES 

There was once a young lady named Mill, 
Who was often most terribly ill. 

She, when asked for the reason 

Of her indisposition, 
Said, " I'm awfully fond of a pill." 

There once lived a girl at Lasell 
Who seldom on Sundays was well. 
When I asked her the cause, 
She said, after a pause, 
" I don't want to go to chapel. 

" When I sit in the chapel 
On Sat'day morn, I quake and trem- 
ble, 'case I might be Sec. pro tern 
Of the Congress of the Sem- 
inary of Lasell 
inary of Lasell." 

There was once a young woman named Etta, 
Who when she did not get a letter, 

She cried out, "Oh my, 

I'm sure I shall die 
If the people don't soon treat me better." 

A teacher did just then pass by, 
Who stopped, and to her did reply, 
" You surely must know 

You should not talk so ; 
Such exaggeration I decrv." 

LASELL MAXIMS 

Every cloud has a silver lining, but many a silk skirt has a cambric one, 

(Priss's always excepted). 
Bear and forbear — our honorary member. 
There are moments when one wants to be alone — " Busy." 
A stitch in time (hurriedly before Gym) saves nine holes in your stocking. 
Into each life some rain must fall — Essays. 

Though Mrs. Martin's Exercises be madness, yet there's method in't. 
Fickleness, thy name is Lasell girl. 
All that live must graduate, passing from Prep to Senior. 



114 



THE ALLERLEI ADVICE TO SENIORS 



Advice to Seniors 

Have you left it till so late? 

Take Junior English. 
E'er you leave our dear old gate, 

Take Junior English. 
Though earth's terrors dire assail you, 
It's a friend that will not fail you ; 
It will cure all ills that ail you — 

Junior English. 
Are you flunker, shark, or grind ? 

Take Junior English. 
Are you maimed or halt or blind, 

Take Junior English. 
It is pleasure's brightest course ; 
It is wisdom's fount and source ; 



It is life's most broadening force — 



Junior English. 



(Adapted.) 



^ 



A Chain of Advice to the Juniors 

Fill your mind with stores of knowledge, 
Knowledge that will help you on — 
On to a resplendent future ; 
Future bright as summer's morn. 
Morn that will be the beginning, — ■ 
The beginning of your fame ; 
Fame which shall but add more fuel, — 
Fuel to your genius' flame. 
Flame that will be never dying, 
Dying tho' the mortal shrine, — 
Shrine which is but lifeless clay, 
Clay breathed into by pow'r Divine. 



"5 



THE ALLERLEI "61" 



"61" 



A pleasant place is sixty-one 

To spend jour time from day to day ; 

Here you can have all kinds of fun. 

In there for you all things are done. 
If you your wish but gently say, 
A pleasant place is sixty-one. 

Some one will always errands run, 
Do everything to make you gay ; 
Here you can have all kinds of fun. 

The things you get to eat 'most stun 
You, when you see what's on the tray ; 
A pleasant place is sixty-one. 

You read and sew, sit in the sun, 
Or else jour time is spent in play ; 
Here you can have all kinds of fun. 

Don't think this room you needs must shun, 
Because 'tis here sick people stay. 
A pleasant place is sixty-one — 
Here you can have all kinds of fun. 

I have written some verse — 
Would you call it a poem? 

In expression 'tis terse. 

I have written some verse 

Which I hope will immerse 
Your thoughts in its foam. 

I have written some verse — 
Would you call it a poem? 



A Phenomenon 

Breathes there a girl with soul so dead, 
Who never to herself has said, 
When the gong thro' all the halls does sound 
At seven, on its daily round, — 
I'm weary? 

If such there be, go, tell Miss Nutt, 
And call the doctor from his hut 
To view this strange unheard of case, 
And remedy bring in breathless haste. 
Oh ! dearie ! ! 

For this young girl is, so to speak, 
In her mental powers a little weak ; 
So she should be made to sit up all night, 
And learn to realize the other girls' plight. 
How dreary ! ! 

116 



THE ALLERLEI MAIL TIME 



Mail Time 

Here I am waiting for mail, 

Stepped on and elbowed and smashed ; 
Strong tho' I am, I am pale, 

But I see that my hopes are all dashed. 

Stepped on and elbowed and smashed, 

Trying to get to my box ; 
But I see that my hopes are all dashed 

Before the wee key it unlocks. 

Trying to get to my box, 

To see if that dear letter is there, 

Before the wee key it unlocks. 
Alas ! I now see it is bare. 

To see if that dear letter is there 

In my box numbered one hundred eight. 

Alas ! I now see it is bare ! 

How cruel the workings of fate ! 

In my box numbered one hundred eight 

There isn't a sign of a letter; 
How cruel the workings of fate ! 

He might surely have treated me better. 

There isn't a sign of a letter ; 

Here I am waiting for mail. 
He might surely have treated me better : 

Strong tho' I am, I am pale. 

The Song of the Strike 

I love her, I love her, 

And who would dare 
To scold me for loving 

A Senior fair. 

To run all her errands 

Is now my delight ; 
But I fear my affections 

She does not requite. 

Other strikes has she, 
A Junior " supe," too ; 

And when I consider 
Their charms, I'm blue. 

Yet if she smiles on me, 
All's bright as the morn ; 

I'm dizzy with gladness, 
All rivals I scorn. 

I flowers will send her 
(The bills to mon fibre); 

All devotion I'll give her, 
My Senior most fair. 



II' 



THE ALLERLEI THE BUSY-SIGN 



The Busy-Sign 



One time I climbed three flights of stairs 
To see a friend — my need was sore ; 

But when at last her room I reached, 
What do you think was on the door? 

A Busy-Sign. 

'Twas vain to knock; I must return, 

And call again some other time. 
The rude card almost seemed to say, 
"Once more you up the stairs must climb." 

That Busy-Sign. 

And oft I've been to see my strike, 
And found a card hung on the door, 

Which meant, " Go back; you cannot pass." 
Oh ! how I hate those letters four, 

The Busy-Sign. 

And yet, like other things, this sign, 
Tho' it has faults, has good points, too; 

And oft has kept me undisturbed 

When /have had much work to do, — ■ 

My Busy-Sign. 

And so I should not be too harsh, 
For it has proved my friend at times, 

And turned away unwelcome ones 
When I was busy making rhymes, — 

Dear Busy-Sign. 

'Tis not its fault that it's misused, 

To prevarication made an aid ; 
Time has taught me I dare to knock, 

And of it not to be afraid, 

Your Busy-Sign. 



A Prisoner 

Thou poor, unhappy bit of glazed clay, 

For faults of others here thou suffer must. 

Thou didst no wrong, didst neither break nor rust,- 

Didst only look thy best the livelong day. 

Ah ! there's thy crime ; all carried thee away 

To hide thee, for of thee they were jealous. 

Yet they who wronged thee are, like thee, but dust, 

And soon or late they for their sins must pay. 

Cheer up, pale one, the worst is yet to come ; 

Thy lot is not so sad as that of some, 

For thou are wooed of all, all drink from thee, 

And none excels in popularity. 

Wait till thou'rt put within the china case, 

And flask of shining silver takes thy place. 

118 



THE ALLERLEI THE STORY OF TWO COLLEGE GIRLS 



The 5tory of Two College Girls 

XT was a beautiful September day when the college opened. The 
cool, crisp air was tempered by the sunny warmth of the late 
Indian summer ; the leaves of the trees on the campus were just 
beginning to put on their lovely autumn colors ; the walks were crowded 
with girls, many of whom were having their first glimpse of college life. 
So it was with Margaret Holmes, a tall girl, with a splendid physique, 
developed by the years spent in her native mountain village. Her large 
gray eyes, shaded by delicately arched eyebrows, looked almost black at 
times under the dark masses of slightly wavy hair ; the expression of her 
mouth was sensitive, almost moody, but the chin was firm and strong — a 
striking girl rather than a pretty one. An orphan, she had lived with 
distant relatives, who, incapable of doing anything unkind, had been uni- 
formly good to the child. But it had never occurred to them to show their 
affection for her in any way, though they cared for her in their simple 
fashion. She had grown up alone, for they could neither realize the inde- 
finable pain in her heart, nor could they comprehend or sympathize with 
her desire to go to college. Her old schoolmaster became interested in her 
progress, and now, by the aid of his help and his books, she was entering 
the Sophomore year. 

Margaret's roommate, an " old girl," came the next day, and was 
greeted with enthusiastic shouts by all her chums. Dorothy Lee was a 
slight girl, with thick curly hair and blue eyes, always filled with fun. The 
daughter of wealthy parents, she had never known an unsatisfied want, and 
her brightness and wit made her a general favorite. When she entered the 
room, accompanied by several friends, she scarcely noticed the dark figure 
at the window until it was fully revealed by the turning on of the electric 
light. Each hesitated a moment ; Margaret certainly had never known 
anyone like Dorothy, and probably Dorothy had never come into close 
contact with anyone just like Margaret. 

"Oh," said Dorothy, "I suppose you must be my new roommate, 
Margaret Holmes." 

" Yes," replied the latter ; " Miss Preston said this was to be my room." 

119 



THE ALLERLEI THE STORY OF TWO COLLEGE GIRLS 

"Well, I'm Dot, and this is Bess and Mab, Nell, Patty and Helen, 
commonly called " Toots" ; they all have other names, you know, but they 
are never recognized here. I suppose they call you Maggie, for short?" 

Margaret flushed painfully ; how could she say that she had never had 
a pet name? But Dorothy chattered on, unnoticing, as she removed her 
wraps. Then giving her fluffy hair a pat, she went out with her friends to 
seek others of her particular chums. 

Left to herself, Margaret turned out the light, and leaning her head on 
her hand, sat at the window watching the shadows come and go in the 
other brilliantly lighted dormitories. " I shall be equally misunderstood 
here," she thought bitterly ; " my roommate is but a butterfly." 

Gradually the room was arranged, but the two girls did not become 
real friends ; they had but little in common. To one, college meant only 
the fun and pleasure to be derived from it; lessons were cribbed, and ex- 
aminations crammed for, as being the simplest method of dealing with a 
necessary evil. For the other, an education was the chief object, and the 
tendency of natural inclination and talent was increased by loneliness. 
Unable to enter into the gayety of Dorothy and her companions, she was 
left much to herself, and the only -way to forget was to become absorbed in 
study. Soon the Faculty took notice of the girl who, reciting so brilliantly, 
and with such a thorough knowledge of her subject, easily led her class. 

The year passed on, and one evening at the close of the first semester, 
Dorothy had invited six of her chums to a spread. Everything was in 
readiness, the fudge was just at the critical point, and the fun grew "fast 
and furious," when a knock was heard at the door. 

" Sh-h-h, girls, be quiet," said Dorothy; "I feel in my prophetic 
bones that Fraulein has smelt the fudge, and invited herself to join us. 
Just stand around so that she can't see what we have, and Patty, you try 
the fudge while I go to the door." 

There was a second knock as she turned to open the door, but it was 
not Fraulein. She returned with a note, and as she read it the merriment 
left her face, and she grew slightly pale ; the girls had never seen her so 
sober. 

" The Dean wishes to see me at once," she said. 

She left the room quickly, and one by one the girls filed softly out, 
leaving Margaret alone in the midst of all the joyous preparations. She 

120 



THE ALLERLEI 



THE STORY OF TWO COLLEGE GIRLS 



quietly put the things away, set the room to rights, "and sat down with a 
book, but she could not study. 

It was nearly an hour before Dorothy returned, sobbing as if her heart 
would break, and throwing her arms around Margaret's neck, told her the 
whole story. She had failed in all the term examinations, and could only 
remain in college on probation. She could not bear the humiliation of 
telling her parents, who, like many others, had heard her bright stories of 
college life, and thought only of their daughter's enjoyment rather than 
of her progress in her studies. Together they discussed the matter for a 
long time, and Margaret, with all the tenderness of one who had all her life 
sighed for love and companionship, for the chance to show herself loving 
and lovable, comforted Dorothy, and promised her help in making up the 
work. 

Drawn together thus by a common bond of sympathy they grew to 
understand each other's natures, and each received something from the 
other. Margaret's brilliant success was like an inspiration to Dorothy, and 
the former presently absorbed something of the latter's gay spirits, till at 
last the two girls, so unlike in disposition and character, became fast friends. 




121 



THE ALLERLEI DOMESTIC SCIENCE (?) 

Domestic Science (?) 

The home was happy as could be. 

Jane said to John : •' At any time 
Bring home with you a friend to tea, 

And we will have a pleasant time." 
Said John to Will in gleeful tone, 
" Won't you come home with me to-night 
To see my wife and little home, 

Which Janie keeps so clean and bright." 
So home with John friend Will did go. 

Jane met her husband with a look, 
And said, " The cook has had to go ; 

And, well you know /cannot cook." 

Sardines and olives — all they had, 

With cheese and crackers at the end. 
Will muttered low, "Well, I am glad 

I don't to matrimony tend." 

Learn then to cook while there is time ; 

This is the moral of these lines. 
There's one thing sure, — you'll always find 

That cooking is the tie that binds. 

Girls of Yesterday and To-day 

There was a time, once, long ago 

When girls learned how to cook and sew; 

And they could also dust and sweep 

And all the rooms in order keep. 

They did not fear to soil their hands, 

But washed and scrubbed both pots and pans. 

But then there came an age when girls 
Cared more for fripperies and curls, 
Than keeping house and cooking meals, 
And with the grocer making deals. 
It was not seemly, so they thought, 
For them i' the kitchen to be caught. 

At last, what joy ! The bright age comes 
When, o'er her work, each dear girl hums, 
And dishes wipes or cooks or sweeps, — 
For now, she her own household keeps. 
She's proud that she's learned self-reliance ; 
It's all due to domestic science. 

The 5ong of the Cook 

Too hard it is to cook, 

In scientific days, 
When one must use a book 

To learn the proper ways; 
Some hardly think it pays 

To give it e'en a look. 

122 



THE ALLERLEI DOMESTIC SCIENCE 

Too hard it is to cook 

In scientific days. 
When all else we've forsook 

To thread this kitchen maze, 
We're sorry we partook 

If we gain not due praise. 
Too hard it is to cook 

In scientific days. 

Domestic Science 

We take domestic science day by day, 

Learn how to use the various pots and pans, 
And very oft it seems to all mere play 

To measure out the contents of the cans. 
To cook by rule is hard at first to try, 

But easier ' comes by practice, so they say. 
To win perfection in that line is why 

We take domestic science day by day. 
Some things we boil, but others we must fry; 

Best bread is made when moulded by our hands ; 
And when it's dene we hold it up and cry, 
" Learn how to use the various pots and pans." 
It's not for us to stay in that one place ; 

There's goods which we must on a pattern lay, 
That more than once turns out a hopeless case, 

Though very oft it seems to all mere play. 
Not only do we sweep and cook and sew, 

For other things we use our dainty hands ; 
To polish well our floors by rule, we know, 

To measure out the contents of the cans. 
Come poverty, come wealth, it matters not, 

We've learned economy and all its laws ; 
We are prepared to share another's lot, 

And comfort bring to any home, because 
We take Domestic Science. 

Wedding Presents 

How delicious is the planning 

To be present at a wedding, 

Where two mutual hearts abide, 

Waiting ere the knot be tied. 

But a present we must send, 

Ere we venture to attend. 

So w~e seek from store to store. 

For something ne'er heard of before ; 

For something novel, something new, 

Of which there'll surely not be two. 

At last the wedding day arrives, 

And we behold to our surprise, 

Numberless trinkets in den and hall, 

So many alike and enough to appall. 

China, silver, and gold galore, 

It looked just like a jewelry store. 

"3 



Illl'] XIII Kll I 



HOOK AND EYE (I) 



I look and liye (I) 



Blalsdell 

Etc., etc. 

Dixon 

Pclrce 

Saunders 

Thatcher 

Cones 



Knlghl 

Kennedy 

Tafl 

1 1 M n i Ington 

Strickland 

Saunders 

Eaton 




WMm I 




y Child 
Webb 




I [uttenbauer 
Etc., etc. 
Reillj 
Millelsen 
Potter, J. 
Tafl 



THE ALLERLEI 



SYNONYMS 




Simes 

Albright 

Reinherz 

Terry 

Johnston 

Carter, II. E. 

Wait 

Wood 

McCIannahan 

Milleisen 

Stahl 

Freuler 



Vicary 

Nims 

Pautot 

Tucker 

Abrams 

Wilson, L. 

Harber 

Sebring 

Richardson 

Blackstock 

Leavitt 

Tilton 



McCarty 


Wheaton 


Stratton 


Orcutt 


Douglass 


Sisson's 


Bemis 


Kempner 


Levi 


Disman 


Serviss 


Irwin 


Wilmarth 


Cones 


Rogers 


Griswold 


Chase, A. 


Radcliffe 


Lane 


At we 11 


Cones 


Wilmarth 


Peirce 


Morrison 



1 luntington 

Ilowald 

Krag 

Mattlage 

Smith 

Ryder 

Puterbaugh 

Ilalberstadt 

Mulliken 

Straight 

Johnson, J. 

Johnson, B. 



Laurens 

Potter, L. 

Jackson 

Child 

Saunders 

Andrus 

Andrews 

Bacon 

Marston 

House 

Blythe 

Stefterson 





A -l<Wy oi! 



THE ALLERLEI ENCYCLOPEDIA LASELLICA 



Encyclopedia Lasellica 

Absences. — Pleasant days spent in bed, with tea and toast, alternated with pills, as 
nourishment. 

Acquaintance. — A convenient receptacle for all news concerning Dick and Bill. 

Attention. — Such a degree of interest in jour recitation, that you needs must ask 
your neighbor what the question was. 

Boy. — A creature of peculiar habits, one of which is kicking and chasing a ball 
around an open field. They can be found in great numbers at a 
distance of about ten miles from Lasell. They are known to ap- 
proach nearer occasionally, when there is a particularly tempting 
bait attracting them. 

Busy. — A state of nothing-to-do-ness, accompanied by a desire for visitors. 

Concentration. — A degree of attention given to studying, so great that you can 
hear the conversation between two friends in the hall. There are 
two kinds, open and closed. The above is an example of open. 

Conscience. — The internal whisper that says, " Don't do it." 

Crush. — See Strike. 

Curiosity. — As some of the girls enjoy doing, paying a thousand dollars to see your 
own appendix. 

Dances. — Measured motion about a room with a girl as partner. 

Excitement. — A rare condition. May be caused by an unusual number of derbies 
on the hall rack. 

Flesh. — Go to Lasell and you'll get it. 

Flowers. — The wherewithal to create a bill. 

Grind. — Obsolete in these halls. 

Hair.— An expensive luxury, now that Marcelles are fifty cents apiece. 

Homesickness. — A state of mind brought about by various causes. That of 
longing for home is merely incidental. 

Iambus. — A kind of foot peculiar in that they seldom come in pairs, but oftener in 
fives. The bigger they are the better. 

Jokes. — Misinterpreted sayings. Meant to raise a laugh ; oftener draw tears. 

Judgment. — Finding out what the teacher wants you to say and saying it. 

Junior. — The quintessence of perfection. 

Knowledge. — Power of saying the right thing. 

Letters. — There are two kinds — letters sent, and letters received. The first contain 
pleas for more money ; the second do not contain the money. 

126 



THE ALLERLEI ENCYCLOPEDIA LASELLICA 

Laughs. — A variety of mirthful noises. The most well known, peculiar, and 
widely varying kinds are known as Ina's laugh, high and silvery. 
Jennie's laugh, low and golden. 

Money. — A medium of exchange between the Italian and Hungry Squad. 

Matches. — The most popular things at Lasell. Everybody wants them. 

Noise. — An awful noise. 

Orchestra. — That which decides the more or less swellness of entertainments at 
Lasell. 

Pills. — The perfect remedy. Will cure all ailments, with the exception of heart- 
aches and homesickness. 

Questions. — Some sorts exceedingly abundant ; viz., those known as Teachers' Ques- 
tions. The rarest and most highly prized are known as Pupils' 
Questions. 

Receptions. — See Times — good and bad. 

Seniors. — An animal of the genus Aves, specie Passeres, and class Orcines. 
They can be told from afar by their wings, beak, and caw. 

Strike. — See Crush. 

Supes. — The most favored of all mortals. For further information on the sub- 
ject see, " Items in any Account Book." 

Sweeping. — One way to get an appetite. 

Tests. — An infallible means of lowering the grades of some, and of raising the 
grades of others. 

Time. — Something to waste. 

Uncle. — The probable generosity of whom is the greatest inducement to keeping our 
schedules in order. 

Verse. — One of the many things Juniors can make, as is evinced by the Allerlei. 

Violet. — '07's Class Flower. 

Visitor. — Synonymous with Excitement, which see. 

Walk. — The bane of a busy girl's life. 

Xanthous. — See Wilde, Sisson E., Strong G., Peirce, Johnson, Kempner, Irwin, and 
Wood. 

Year. — Any length of time from a day to a century. 

Z. — Blessed letter, for it means the end. 



127 



THE ALLERLEI JUST HOW IT WAS 



Just How It Was 




ANY years ago in the south of England there was a great forest 
of wild and rugged growth, but enclosing here and there in its 
shaggy depths lovely little glades, where were springs of clear, 
cold water that bubbled joyously out of dark little nooks close under pro- 
jecting rocks, where green grass grew emerald bright, and the tall trees 
that hemmed in these open spots cast, as light breezes blew, wavering 
shadows on turf and water and lichened rock. In one of these glades a 
forester had built himself a modest cot, where he lived content and secure 
with his quiet wife and his small daughter ; a merry, blue-eyed sylph, 
golden haired, and as light of foot as "the fleet-foot fawn" that slips so 
noislessly through the forest ways that the hunter knows not she is near 
till she is far beyond range of his trusty rifle. Then he sees a-down the 
dim vistas of columned aisles a sudden sun gleam on a glossy coat, and 
realizes that he has missed his quarry. He raises his rifle to fire, smiles 
at himself, lowers it, and pursues his silent way through the dusky wood- 
land, — this man who treads the forest floors intent only upon slaying the 
wild, furry creatures or the feathered children of those quiet, sequestered 
spaces, and never heeds the shrill scream of fear, the note of agony, or the 
dying groan of the poor thing struck in mid flight by the cruel bullet that 
cuts short its thread of life, — life which is so dear to all created things that 
nothing is to be compared with it. To save his life the trapped fox will 
gnaw off his own splendid brush, and return mutilated to his wild-wood 
kindred ; that fine brush to secure which Boldness and Beauty mount wild- 
eyed steeds, and with pack at heels and holloa ! ho ! chase for exhilarating 
miles o'er hill and dale and verdant mead, mad with excitement, all a-flush 
and a-thrill with tingling life, and heeding naught but the quarry. Ah, it's 
rare sport, is the chase ! And such sport as this makes for both brawn 
and brain in the long run; which thing is often ignored by those who 
object that it is cruel to the fox, forgetting that in these days cruelty to 
animals is practically prohibited by that very excellent society, that for 
the Prevention of, etc., and is further discouraged by the charming work 

128 



THE ALLERLEI JUST HOW IT WAS 

of such men as Burroughs, Torrey, Seton-Thompson (or vice versa), 
Sharp, and others, to know whose hooks is a liheral education. What 
more delightful way to live out the sweet length of a warm spring day 
than to ensconce oneself under spreading .branches in a green corner 
of the river-bordering field, with a volume of Burroughs in hand, field- 
glass near by, and senses all attuned to nature's latest overture ; or, if 
one's taste be more catholic, say a volume of lyrics, or E. S. Martin's 
charming essays, or Mrs. Rorer's latest edition. That last, now, — can one 
really do better than to stud}' carefully her concise, crisp, workmanlike 
directions how to make a sponge cake without sponge, or a charlotte russe 
when Charlotte has suddenly decided to marry and leave you cookless, or 
a blanquette of chicken where no wool is required? I have always admired 
Mrs. Rorer ; she tells you so quietly, calmly, ladylikely, to take thus and 
so, and do such and such things to it in a utensil of which you never even 
heard the name before, while the materials to be manipulated are all 
"made in Germany," like the American postal cards, or cost five good 
hard dollars per can. And, speaking of cans, did you ever notice how 
very taking are those of Campbell's, about which cluster those very chubby 
children whose cheeks are as red and hard as Pegotty's, whose eyes always 
express surprise the most exquisitely ecstatic, and whose trousers, skirts, 
and hosiery are chronically nipped in the bud, " pulled a year too soon," 
like Pat's pantaloons, ere they had attained their full growth. A pathetic 
thought, this, of the untimely taking off of the young, the immature, all 
their splendid possibilities never to-be realized, all their winsomeness, their 
entrancing exuberance of youth and life, checked, destroyed, vanished 
quite. As we consider the sad problem anew we are irresistibly drawn on 
and ever on in our quest of the great Wherefore, for which all at such 
moments must seek, though ever baffled, never able to approach a solution 
of the terrible question, till — happy thought — the eye is lifted, and the melan- 
choly philosophizer, seeker for truth, would-be solver of the question of 
the universe, confronts at full gaze the broad, beaming, spirit-strengthening 
smile of the wearer of the broad-brimmed hat that guards the sacred shrine 
of Quaker Oats. He strides joyously across the green to see his white-robed 
young son bat a small ball wildly back and forth over an extended net, and 
by him comes a curiously double-visaged old gentleman, now blue, now- 
rosy, bearing a package of orangeine. Begone, dull care! Richard is 

129 



THE ALLERLEI JUST HOW IT WAS 

himself again, and the world may wag as it will, yet shall it not find me 
with furrowed brow nor anxious gaze trying to play fortune-teller to my- 
self. 

But, let me see! Where was I? Oh, the beautiful child of the for- 
ester. Well, she grew up, went to school, married, and lived happy ever 
after, for had she not attended Lasell ? 

"Mary," said her mother, severely, yet -with some bewilderment, 
" What is all this you've been writing this morning? " 

"That's my senior essay, mamma," replied Mary," "I'm so glad it's 
done. Oh, it has worried me so ! I'm so afraid of Miss Blank. She 
insists so much on transitions, and I'm sure I wouldn't know a transition 
from a banana, if I saw one this minute." 

" But don't you ever paragraph your essays?" her mother asked. 
"Surely," said Mary; "but this somehow seems to run on so easily. 
Why, don't you know, I mean so sort of — it just laps right over, one part 
on another. Well, anyway, I don't know how to paragraph it. She'll do 
it for me, I guess, with side notes." 

" You must be a trial to her," said her mother. 




130 



THL MAGAZINE THAT LNTLRTAIN5 

LVLRYBODY'S 



Ldited by 
Published by 



LARTHA MAURLN5, CLLLN HARTLR 
THL ALLLRLLI PUBLISHING CO., ROOM 4, LASE.LL 



VOLUME. 



1907 



NO. I 



The Magazine of Wit 



CONTAINS 



Many important suggestions to subscribers. 

Interesting advertisements. 

A number of reviews of the latest books of the year, 
by a well known critic, etc. 



Advertising Section 



Books 



The Right of Way 



The Faculty 



With a short biography of the lives of the 
authors. 



The Secret of Popularity 

Maude Stmes 

A wonderfully interesting story, based on the 
life tjf the author. 

The Home I left Behind Me 

Helen Leavitt 

A most pathetic little tale, that will draw tears 
from the hardest hearted bookworm. It is the 
story of a young girl, who had enjoyed every 
pleasure and advantage that heart could desire, 
until cruel circumstances required her departure 
from the home of her birth, to struggle with the 
difficulties and disagreeablenesses of life which 
presented themselves to her in the forms of Eng- 
lish, German, Mathematics. 



The Return of Sherlock Holmes 

Mary Masters 

A series of thrilling adventures, full of mystery 
and excitement, that will make your hair stand on 
end. After beginning this book you will not be 
able to put it down till you have finished it. 

The Pleasures of Work 

Laurens and Carter 

A true story presented in a most unique and 
delightful manner. A well known reviewer says, 
"Plenty of go and swing to 'The Pleasures of 
Work.' " 



Flowers I Have Received 



Clara Mattlage 



Delicious, fragrant, elaborately attractive, 
of the most charming books of the season. 



One 



131 



THE ALLERLEI 



EVERYBODY'S 



Why My Account Is So Large 

Marion Stall I 

One strong motive dominates this story, the love 
of maid for maid. This is one of the most thought- 
about and talked-about stories of the year. 



Methods of Arranging Hair 

Conant-Meyer 

An absorbing book, that promises to interest all 
classes of readers. 



Silence — A Virtue 



Helen Huntington 



A powerful and deeply interesting story. No 
living author is so competent to write on this 
subject. 



Good Nature Sorely Tried 

Lucy E. Reilly 

The material for this very successful story has 
been drawn from the personal experiences of the 
author. This book cannot fail to be interesting to 
all persons afflicted with busy roommates. 

Up with the Sun 

Grace Vicar y 

A bright, sunny little tale, teeming with glitter- 
ing atmosphere, and full of the zest of life. 

The Great Profits to be Derived from the 

Scientific Cultivation of Hens 

Florence Stark 

A most vivid description of the advantages to be 
gained from the training of these interesting crea- 
tures. Among other things, the author mentions 
the possibility of securing by means of this work 
many valuable trinkets and ornaments, also gloves, 
flowers, etc. 



SEVEN WONDERS OF LASELL 

The Elevator. 

The Priestess of Ozone. 

Lasell Canoe Club. 

The Forrest Primeval. 

Sophomore Meetings (frequency of) 

The Red Lights after 9.30. 

Superiority of 'o7's Allerlei. 



A LASELL SONG 
I 

When first they weighed me at Lasell, 
My weight was pounds one-twenty- 
five. 
If now to you my weight I'd tell, 

You might exclaim, "Land sakes 
alive ! " 

Chorus 

We gain in something every day, 

If it only be a pound of fat. 
Our clothes are tight, but what care we 

For such a little thing as that? 
Hurrah ! We sing with mirth and joy, 

We are the girls of avoirdupois. 

II 

When first I came my clothes did fit, 
My belts were large, my dresses loose : 

But ere a month had passed, I called 
My seamstress every kind of goose. 



Chorus 

I gained in something ever}- day, 
If it only were a pound of fat ; 

My clothes were tight, and much I cared 
For such a weighty thing as that. 

" Sad fate ! " I cried, bereft of joy; 
" I am a girl of avoirdupois." 

Ill 

But now I have a new wardrobe, 
And now I think what is the dif' 

If I am larger than you are, 
I don't care half a dollar if — 

Chorus 

I gain in something every day, — 
Something besides a pound of fat. 

My clothes are loose, and I don't care, 
For such a little thing as that. 

Hurrah ! I sing once more with joy, 
I am a girl of avoirdupois. 



SQUELCHING 

The quantity of squelching knows no 

change. 
It droppeth as the gentle rain from 

heaven 
Upon the girl nearby. It is twice blest ; 



13-! 



THE ALLERLEI 



EVERYBODY'S 



It blesseth her that's squelched and her 
that squelches. 

'Tis mightiest in the mightiest. It be- 
comes 

The learned teacher better than her book. 

Her squelching shows the force o' schol- 
astic power, 

The attribute of awe and tyranny : 
Herein doth sit the dread and fear of 
teachers. 

But mercy is above this sceptred sway ; 
It is enthroned in the hearts of teachers. 
It is an attribute of the principal himself, 

And squelching doth show likest the 

principal's : 
Then mercy seasons justice. Therefore, 

teacher, 

Tho' chastisement be thv plea, consider 
this, 

That in our course at boarding school, 
none of us 

Should care for squelches all the time. 

We do all seek for praise, and that same 
search 

Doth teach us all the terrible discipline 
of squelching. 

THE TRIUMPH OF THE VIOLET 

Since first from 'neath my leafy bower 

I peeped at sun and earth and sky, 
Have poets sung the beauties of 

My purple petals and saffron eye. 
They say, I seem a star enclosed 

Within a bit of night's sky-blue; 
And oft they call me "flower of love," 

For I am ever faithful, true. 

The beauty of their ladies' eyes, 

They praise for they have color mine; 
And tho' I'm not the queen of flowers, 

Of all the rest I'm most divine. 
And yet withal I have remained 

For aye the modest floweret, 
And will forever modest be 

Naught but a dainty violet. 
Tho' modest, I yet glow with pride 

Which lifts me to the heights of 
heaven ; 
For Juniors fair have willed that I 

Should be the flower of " oughty- 
seven." 



TO THE SENIORS 

Methinks our class do not as fretful 

children 
(The Junior classes of the previous years) 
Who sighing for a Senior gown too soon, 
Must needs attempt to steal it unawares. 
Our dignity (the equal of a Senior's) 
We do not in unthinking haste impair 
By ransacking their closets for possession 
Of cap and gown, altho' we know they're 

there. 
The Seniors grave may have their gowns 

and welcome ; 
Next year we shall have plenty of our 

own . 
As to the momentous advent of your 

gowns — 
We wished you to enjoy them in the 

pride 
Of your fond hearts, and yet not flatter 

you 
By giving the applause you thought your 

due. 



(Suggestions for a Title would come 
in Handy and be of Serviss) 

One balmy day I was in the garden 
Potter-ing around my Plants, and look- 
ing to see if there were any Ferns or 
Lillies coming up, when one of my 
young friends passed by on her way from 
school. 

" Won't you come in and stay to lunch- 
eon ?" I called. 

"Thank you, yes," she responded. 
" I'm so tired of Eato)i Bacon and Gra- 
ham bread, and that is all we seem to 
have at home." 

"Now do tell me all about your school 
happenings," I begged, and she Straight- 
way began. 

" Our Junior class are all so angry over 
the loss of our great treasure, the class 
Peirce, which was of so much Serviss to 
us. We think some one has stolen it and 
gone abroad, and we are just Thurston 
for revenge; but we may Z?e/«w-taken, 
and the best we can do is Wait. 

" I have an original story to write soon 
for English, and am worrying so over a 
plot. I believe it will be about two 
lovers who have secret meetings in the 
Lane by the lonely little House on the 



133 



THE ALLERLEI 



EVERYBODY'S 



Mountain. He will be a fine, Strong fel- 
low, who comes dashing up to meet his 
lady love on a beautiful charger. They 
will stroll slowly along, Terry-ing on 
the Heath to Argue whether the wedding 
shall be in Mate or June. Then perhaps 
the irate father will come Chase-ing 
them. 

"That is as far as I have planned; I 
really must not tire you with any Moore 
of my chatter, but hurry home to do my 
geometry lesson, all about Cones, and 
then go to work on the Allerlei. Though 
we editors are Albright, we shall cer- 
tainly be all Tucker-ed out, perhaps 
Stark crazy, before the book is edited, I 
am sure, though you will all be Wilde 
about it when you see it." 



WANTS 

Wanted. — To go to town without a 
chaperone. 

Wanted. — Some one to listen to Miss 
Smither's puns. 

Wanted. — Stamps. 

Wanted. — A chaperone — Helen E. 
Carter and Edna Thurston. 

Wanted. — To learn the mandolin. 

Teacher of same please apply 

to Cornelia Eaton. 
Wanted. — Something to run — Helen 

Huntington. 

Wanted. — Critical ability' — Martha R. 
Laurens. 

Wanted. — A new strike — Maud Ken- 
nedy. 

Wanted. — Missionary dues— Treasurer 
Missionary Society. 

Wanted. — A letter from home — Ethel 

Taft. 
Wanted. — An able person to interpret the 

French questions. Please see 

Ethel McCorkendale. 
Wanted. — A box of crackers, by the 

starving occupants of Room 

62. 
Wanted. — A dozen bottles of ink in 

Room 4. 



Wanted. — Time — Helen E. and Martha 
R. 

Wanted. — Something to do — Kathryn 
McClannahan and Ada Wood. 

Wanted. — Something to read — Maie 
Straight. 

Wanted. — Ideas for the Allerlei (evi- 
dent enough without any ad- 
vertising) — M. P. W. 



TO LET 

To Let. — A Stahl for your pony. Ap- 
ply to Marion. 

To Let. — The chairmanship of the dec- 
orating committee of Lasell 
social functions. Apply to 
Helen E. Carter. 

To Let. — My services as a palmist — 

Florence Child. 
To Let. — A curling iron — Dot Caldwell. 

To Let. — A gray feather boa — Maude 
Simes. Only Mildred John- 
ston need apply. 

To Let. — A pink silk scarf — LucyReilly. 

To Let. — Services as a Marcelle wavist 
— Alice Hobbs. 

To Let. — Puns for all occasions — Cor- 
nelia Eaton. 



FOR SALE 

For Sale. — A ticket. Apply to Ina 
Harber. 

For Sale. — Bricks. Apply to Martha 

Laurens. 
For Sale. — Bookmarks. Apply to Kath- 

erine Washburn. 

For Sale. — A pair of shoes. Apply to 
Fan Thatcher. 

For Sale. — A shirt waist. Apply to 
Helen E. Carter. 

For Sale. — A pair of silk gloves. Ap- 
ply to Esther Levi. 



!34 



THE ALLERLEI 



EVERYBODY'S 



QUESTIONS 

Who is going to have the editorial page 
of the morning newspaper? 

Dolorosa I. 

Everyone who doesn't take Political 
Economy and isn't interested. 

Dolorosa II. 

How may I learn to play the mandolin 
without taking lessons, and how may I 
persuade my father to buy me one? 

C A E N. 

Practice steadily from morn till night 
regardless of neighbors' annoyance. 
Don't bother to buy one of your own but 
borrow one. 

Sister Helen. 

Please tell me how I may keep a back 
comb in my hair for two consecutive 
minutes? 

M d J N. 

After all your trials I'd give it up as an 
impossibility. 

Sister Helen. 

Do you think I shall be repaid for my 
trouble if I embroider a lingerie waist. 
C te R R. 

Yes, if you embroider a leaf or two, 
and then send it home for your mother 
to finish. 

Sister Helen. 



I TEACH SIGN-PAINTING 

I teach Card Writing or Lettering by 
personal instruction, and guarantee suc- 
cess. Only field not over-crowded. My 
instruction is unequalled, because per- 
sonal, practical, and thorough. Easy 
terms. 

Saunders j School of I Taft 
Abrams I Lettering [ Reiniierz 



BE A SALESMAN ON THE ROAD 

In six weeks we will educate you in 
salesmanship, and assist you to a posi- 
tion. Send for free booklet. 

Washburn-Laurens System. 



WE MAKE A FIRST-CLASS 
BOOKKEEPER 

of you in six weeks, for thanks, or re- 
turn same if results prove unsatisfactory. 
I find Position too ! Free ! Write ! 

Annie Dealey, Instructor. 



I CAN HELP YOU MAKE MONEY! 

Nothing pays like success in Writing 
Fiction. We revise and criticise your 
MSS. on commission, and advise you 
whether to tear them up or not. 

( Dr. Winslow, 
Address < Miss Mary P. Witherbee, 

( Miss Lillie R. Potter. 



ARE YOU TOO THIN? 

If so, write to me, and I can tell you 
what to do, so that in sixty minutes you 
can gain any amount you desire, even to 
the smallest fraction of an ounce. Your 
face and figure will be well shaped, your 
skin will be clear and handsome, you 
will feel years younger. All this can be 
gained by a short residence at Lasell, 
and by taking Mrs. Martin's Psycho- 
Physical Culture. Fuller particulars on 
request. 

Ina Harber. 



I CAN REDUCE FLESH 

I can reduce your weight almost im- 
mediately, any amount you wish, from 
one to one hundred pounds. Write for 
free booklet, " How to Get Thin." The 
following list of names are those of a few 
of my pupils: Misses Ryder, Vicary, 
Reilly. Send for testimonials. 

Caroline Steinmetz. 



LEARN DRESSMAKING 

By mail at your own home, during leis- 
ure hours, or come to Room 59. 

Stark-Bemls System. 



135 



THE ALLERLEI 



EVERYBODY'S 





By an entirely new process never used 
elsewhere, we build tissue wherever it is 
needed. Noses such as are shown in the 
first two of the above illustrations were 
brought to their true lines in TWO 
treatments. Our staff of physicians is 
composed of the most expert in the 
world, and satisfaction is assured. Lit- 
erature pertaining to this subject sent 
free. If you cannot call, write. 

DERMATOLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF 
LASELL. 

Staff of Physicians — Messrs. Johnston, 
Eaton, C. Blakestad, Reilly, 

Harber. 



HOW ONE GIRL MADE MONEY 

A STORY OF SUCCESS 

A few days ago one of our number 
earned little, spent it all, and wanted 
more. Happening one day to read our 
ad. she discovered many new ways of 
earning money. Space forbids us to tell 
of all her ventures, among which are 
mending clothes, making them to order, 
trimming hats, making old clothes better 
than new. Within two days she had 
earned $1.29. The truth of this phenom- 
enal success may be verified by writing 
to F. D. Stark. Any ambitious person 
who wishes to better her position in life 
should write to our Money-Making 
Bureau. 



YOU ARE TOO SHORT 

It is no longer necessary to be short 
and uncomfortable. The Cartilage Com- 
pany possesses a method whereby from 
one inch to two feet may be added to 
the stature. If you would like to add to 
your height, so as to be able to see in a 
crowd, /'. e., to be able to see if there is 
a letter in your box at mail time, write at 
once for our booklet, " How to Grow 
Tall," with testimonials from such fa- 
mous people as Pauline Spear, Julia 
Potter, Anna White, Florence Disman. 

The Cartilage Company. 



DO YOU USE SLOAN'S LINIMENT 
FOR RHEUMATISM 

It is used by all famous physicians, 
and gives instantaneous relief. Free to 
Try. Our agent, Cora Danforth, has 
used it with remarkable success. 
Samples furnished on application to 
Room 12. 



A NEW SENIOR PIN 

We wish to call attention to our new 
Senior Pin. The design is simple and 
beautiful, since it is the product of our 
own brain. 



7 SUTHERLAND SISTERS' 

Hair Preparations, Scalp Treatments, 
Shampooing Methods, possess great 
merit. Their representative, Miss Suth- 
erland, at Lasell, is a perfect artist in 
her profession. Remember it's the hair, 
not the hat (even though you do take 
millinery), that makes a Lasell girl 
attractive. 



136 



THE ALLERLEl EVERYBODY'S 

LAu 1 W LLl\ - AND TWELFTH 



THL 5LNIOR VACATION 

With Maude 5imes as Leading Lady 

MAIN ACTION OF THL PLAY -No Work and all Play 

Manager, Belascoe's Rival, Mrs. Martin 

COMING ! COMING ! COMING ! 

- TO LA5LLL =^=^== 

THL GREAT DRAMA 

" Commencement Week " 

BIGGEST PRODUCTION EVER STAGED ! A Senior Class of 32, 

aided by all the previous graduating classes since founding of school. 

Undergraduates, families, and friends, for a brilliant stage-setting. 

Don't Fail to Attend. Reserved Seats. Admittance by ticket, as usual 

THL BOOK OF THL YLAR! 

A book that breathes the very spirit of Lasell. Miss Laurens shows "The 
Behind the Scenes," of every phase of the Seminary's life. From the insignificance 
of the Prep, to the splendor of the Senior; from the mild radiance of an evening 
meal in the dining room to the brilliant whirl of the fashionable Receptions — 
nothing is left untouched. It is a great book, and one valuable for its intimate 
knowledge of Lasell, as well as for the fascinating interest of its contents. Illustra- 
tions by the leading artists of the Class of '07. YOU will enjoy reading it. 

THL ALLLRLEI 

137 



THE ALLERLEI A RIME OF THE CLASSES 



A Rime of the Classes 

Each year brings with its many things 

A story new to tell, 
Of laurels won, of great things done, 

At our dear old school, Lasell. 
So in this book, if you chance to look 

In this our Allerlei, 
All of the tricks from " ought five " to " ought six " 

Are here for you to espy. 
The Senior Class? 'Tis sad it must pass 

From the walls of dear Lasell ; 
But the mem'ries endeared of the class we once feared 

Will last till the judgment knell. 
Of the Sophomore Class we will not say much, 

For their welfare we do not fear ; 
But secret meetings are not quite in their line, — 

Let's hope they'll do better next year. 
The Freshman Class, with its cheer so rash, 

Will soon wear a cap and gown ; 
And in about four years, their greatest of fears 

Will be " they must leave this fair town." 
We're far too modest to say we're the best 

Of all this illustrious four; 
So we leave it to you 'uns to judge of our doin's, 

Hoping none of the rest will be sore. 



138 



THE ALLERLEI THE DEAR DEER-HOUSE 



The Dear Deer-House 



All resplendent in paint you stand, 
Brave little deer-house upon the hill, 

Adorned by the brush of a master hand, 
Which cost our class a tremendous bill. 

Trebly dear in your glory of paint 

Are you, deer-house, to the Junior heart, 

Standing for our ambition reached, 
Standing for the highest yet in art. 

Dear in respect to the cost of a coat, 

Dear also in your size, tho' small ; 
Deer was the purpose for which you were built, 

Though none have been seen of late years at all. 

Last year your coat was of color right, 
For the yellow '05's plainly were seen ; 

But the work was done in haste and fright, — 
The appearance untidy, not neat nor clean. 

This year all must be beauty and grace. 
So with great care our plans were laid ; 

No one our triumph should dare to deface, 
Nor out-witted Sophs or Seniors staid. 

We did get ahead of our rival classes ; 

Hearken now to the wonderful story — 
It is indeed an exciting tale, — 

How the little house attained its glory. 

An agreement was made with painters skillful; 

The night came round, and interest grew; 
Two faithful Juniors, loyal and dutiful, 

Sat up half the night to see the deed through. 

Anxiously watching, soon midnight drew nigh, 
Alarmed were they lest the plan fall through ; 

What if the chance should pass them by? 
They certainly were in a terrible stew. 

The autumn air was full sharp and cold ; 

Huddled close by the window wide, 
Heard they no welcome sounds, those girls, 

Nor was aught on the hill to be espied. 

Sudden there broke upon the stillness 

The distinct " toot-toot " of an auto horn, 

And a big machine rolled into the driveway ; 
The expectant girls were no more forlorn. 



139 



THE ALLERLEI THE DEAR DEER-HOUSE 



The auto glided to the barn and stopped there ; 

Men jumped out armed with paint and brush. 
The watchman gazed with incredulous stare 

As they stormed the hill with a mighty rush. 

Lanterns flashed brightly all around ; 

The men began at once to toil. 
The work progressed with scarcely a sound, 

And those big yellow '05's thej' soon did spoil. 

Soon, to the great joy of everyone, 

A big '07 was plainly seen ; 
Hugging each other, the girls whispered gleefully, 
4i Oh, won't the Seniors think we are mean ! " 

And when the task was finally done, 

Silent the men in the auto departed. 
The big machine rolled swiftly away; 

All was as still as before they started. 

Glad at the thought of the wonder of all, 

When the morning light should reveal the surprise, 

The two girls soon asleep did fall, 

With never a worrying doubt or surmise. 

With the first streak of morning light, 

They rushed to the window to see how 'twas done. 

What met their gaze? Ah, what a sad sight ! 
Of course that wet paint had most awfully run. 

But at least the house belonged to the Juniors, 
And, undaunted, next day they tried again : 

Two more visitations, and the result was perfection, 
So great indeed was the skill of the men. 

Speak not the envy of rival classes, 

When they saw the result of our glorious plan ; 
They have not dared to deface it — wise lasses ! 

And surely no one ever can. 

Resplendent the house now stands on the hill 
With its big purple letters on virginal white ; 

Forever and always may it abide still, 
To keep the memory of our class bright. 

Now let us cheer for the dear, dear deer-house, 

And after that we'll give you then, 
The grandest class of our Alma Mater. 

The Class of Nineteen S-E-V-E-N. 



140 



THE ALLERLEI 



DREAMS 



DRl 



A M 5 



Imo Blakestad 
Jess Tucker 
Kathryn McClannahan 
Mary - Wilmarth 
Maie Straight 
Ethel Taft 
Charlotte Ryder 
Grace Yicary- 
Cora Reinherz 
Bess Judson 
Inez Stratton 
Martha Laurens 
Helen E. Carter 
Cornelia Eaton 
Genevra Strong 
Mildred Johnston- 
Katharine Washburn 
Ada Wood 
Lela Goodall 
Fan Kempner 
Florence Boyce 
Jonathan (Marion) 
David (Prissy) 
Florence Hovey 
Lucy Reilly- 
Ina Harbor 
Maude Simes 
Margaret Fuller 
Marie Cogswell 
Sally- Strong 
Helen Huntington 
Louise Kelly" 
Mildred Peirce 
Marie Andrews 
Helen F. Carter 
Edna Thurston 
Bab Wait 
Mary" Masters 
Cora Danforth 



Latin Grammar 

French 

Her singing 

Sour pickles 

Doughnuts 

Her Senior Year 

Past good times 

Her baby sister 

Boston University 

Home, sweet home 

Her English 

Bright remarks of her young brother 

The Allerlei 

Mandolin music 

Shadow embroidery 

Her graduating dress 

Pennsylvania 

A Yellow House 

Spring Hats 

Worcester, Madison, Galveston 

Pancakes 

David (Prissy) 

Jonathan (Marion) 

Drill 

Her Dog 

Her wardrobe 

Writing a poem 

Her Japanese Parasol 

Her Cap and Gown 

Washington 

The Navy 

Minutes 

Egypt 

Ina 

Brilliant Future 

Pottsville 

Millinery 

Making up lessons 

Advertisements 



141 



THE ALLERLEI THE FIRST DAY 



The First Day 



The New Girl : "Is this your room? 
Oh! isn't it dear! 
You just ought to see mine ; 
It's right over here. 

It's the tiniest thing, — 
Just about two by four ; 

And because of the bed 
We can't open the door." 

The Old Girl : " Yes, mine is much better, 

But of course you must know 
That, being an old girl, 
I first wrote a letter 

To tell them exactly 
Where to put me ; 

So that is the reason 
I'm in here, you see!" 

The New Girl : " Well, I'm sorry I came. 
If I have to live here, 
I shall go home to-morrow, — 
You just see — O-o-h d-e-a-r !' 

There's a good time coming, girls, 

A good time coming; 
We will no longer have to toil 
Under or above the soil 

In the good time coming; 
But have fun from morn till night, 
Till limbs and mind grow stronger; 
And everyone shall read and write : 

Wait a little longer. 

There's a good time coming, girls, 

A good time coming ; 
We'll pass thro' the open door, 
Forgetting all, forevermore 

In the good time coming ; 
Firmly fighting, we shall win. 
To make our patience stronger 
Vacation now will soon begin — 

Wait a little longer. 

There's a good time coming, girls, 

A good time coming ; 
Let us aid it all we can, 
Unceasingly upon it plan, 

The good time coming. 
Smallest helps, in the right way, 
Make the ardor stronger ; 
' Twill be strong enough one day — 

Wait a little longer. 



142 



THE ALLERLEI THE TALE OF THE HORSE 



The Tale of the Horse 

i. As I ride, as I ride 

With a blind trust in my guide, 
Leaving grammar all untried, 
Knowing words and naught beside, 
Sense and reason all denied, 
Gazing not on either side, 
As I ride, as I ride. 

2. As I ride, as I ride 

Down the broad, broad path I glide, 
Toward exams. I can't abide. 
Then, when cramming, hollow-eyed, 
I my fate to luck confide ; 
But a slip is close beside 
' Cause I ride, ' cause I ride. 

Oh for a thought that is new, 

A word not used oft before. 
We search through our brain, in view 

Of finding some secret door. 

For something with wit and life, 

That will please and delight the ear, 

Or something of trouble and strife, 
Which will bring a sigh or a tear. 

But the Allerlei Board search in vain 
For something of some real worth ; 

And they know in their sorrow and pain 
There is not a new thing on this earth. 



(Adapted.) 



A Monologue 

(Frequently repeated on Sunda}' mornings, 7.15 A.M.) 

To go or not to go, — that is the question : 

Whether ' tis better to feign great illness, 

To stay all day in soft and downy bed, 

Or to rise, and later go my way to church, 

And to-morrow go to town? To rest, to sleep 

Again ; and by a sleep to say I end 

The headache and the weariness of school 

That all are heir to, — 'tis a consummation 

Devoutly to be wished. To rest, to sleep, — 

But on the morrow? Aye, there's the rub; 

For in that rest I sleep away my chance 

Of shopping in Boston — I needs must go. 

Methinks I'll rise, and bear these ills I have, 

Rather than the penalty ; my mind will ne'er 

Be proof against the thought of Monday's bargains. 



H3 



THE ALLERLEI THE HOUSE OF A THOUSAND HUES 



The House of a Thousand Hues 

On a little hill that's round and green, 
Stands a house, full plainly seen, 
Clothed in purple and in white, — 
The work of one October night. 

Its history's not for me to tell, 
For every class now knows it well ; 
But its possession's a mark of fame — 
Into the Juniors brave hands it came. 

Every year must its raiment go. 
And new class colors must it show. 
There have been red, and yellow and blue, 
But those are old to all of you. 

Now when it fell into our care, 
It was with pride that we placed there, 
The colors new which affirm our might — 
The royal purple and beautiful white. 

Then one morn there came a change, 
One perhaps not very strange, — 
And blazoned bright as the sun in heaven 
Stood our grand symbol, '07. 




144 



THE ALLERLEI KALENDAR 



Kalendar 

September 26. Arrival of new girls. 

27. Address of Welcome by Mrs. Martin. 

28. Lecture on Dr. Johnson and his Literary Club by Leon 

H. Vincent. 

29. Miss Adler gives her first free show at the Annex. 

30. Miss Potter lectures on " Cleanliness next to Godliness." 
30. Reception to new girls. 

October 2. Trip to Bunker Hill and Navy Yard. 

5. Lecture: "Oliver Goldsmith and Laurence Sterne," 

Dr. Vincent. 

6. Miss Nutt lectures on Health and Hygiene. 

7. Seniors give French reception. Juniors and Sophs put 

to practice the art of listening. 

S. Miss Adler puts in an early appearance at history. 

9. Excursion to Lexington and Concord. 

12. Dr. Vincent lectures on Jane Austen. 

14. Nantasket excursion. 

iS. Party go to Boston to visit the steamship Arabic. 

19. Lecture on Victor Hugo by Dr. Vincent. Everyone 
takes notes. 

21. Miss Call and her nerve training. Concentration and 
relaxation. 

23. Trip to Cambridge. 

26. Same old story of caps and gowns. 

H5 



THE ALLERLEI 



KALENDAR 



October 28 



29 



November 



10 
1 1 

: 3 

H 

18 

20 

3 3 

25 

December 2 

3 

7 
11 

H 

i5 

17 
19 

21 



Miss Call's second lecture. Lessons prepared, and great 
enthusiasm shown. 

Christening of Karandon House, Clark Cottage, Cush- 
man Hall and Carter Hall. Halloween Party. 

Lecture : " Alexandre Dumas," Dr. Vincent. 

Lecture on Dress, Manners and Charm by Emma Moffet 

Tyug- 

Great excitement among candidates for societies. 

Temperature not the only thing that falls. 

Fortunate girls who visited the steamship Arabic entertain 
one officer. 

Miss Adams talks on her work in China. 

Miss Call lectures. Two kinds of attention, open and 
closed. 

Trip to Old Boston. 

Lecture on Greece by Dr. Cooley. 

Miss Call talks. Music furnished by graphophone to 
reward the girls for their concentrated attention. 

Party goes to hear Mme. Emma Eames. 

Miss Call gives a short talk. 

Lecture on Macbeth by Colonel Sprague. 

Auction of papers and magazines. 

Lecture: "International Duelling," Mrs. Edwin D. 
Meade. 

Party sees Marlowe and Sothern in " As You Like It." 

Christmas Vespers by Glee Club. 

Pupils term Recital. 

Vacation begins. 



146 



THE ALLERLEI 



KALENDAR 



January 



February 



1906 

9. Homesickness prevails. 

13. Party go to hear Mme. Sembrich. 

1^. Several parties see William Gillette in "Clarice." 

18. Dr. Morris lectures on Health. 

25. Signorita Caroline Marcial wins the hearts of Lasell 



2 7 
1 

3 

7 
10 



i7- 

iS. 

21. 

22. 



24. 



girls. 



Seniors delightful reception for the Juniors. 

German reception. 

S. D's give dance for the other societies. 

Party see Willard in " The Professor's Love Story." 

Violent discussion of football in Parliamentary Drill. 

1 1 . Day of Prayer. Girls go home over Sunday. 

12. Dr. Morris lectures to the Seniors. 
St. Valentine's Day. 

Juniors entertain Seniors with a Japanese garden party. 
Gloves and hats returned. 
Orphean Club gives mid-year concert. 



George Washington's Birthday. Tow heads in the 
majority. 

"Masquers" give finest vaudeville performance ever 
put on in Lasell. 



25. Dr. Winslow leads chapel. All join in the services. 

26. Excursion to New Boston. 
28. Lent begins. 



H7 



THE ALLERLEI 



KALENDAR 



March 



3 

9 

J 3 

i5 
16 

l 7 

22 

3 3 
2 4 



Miss Mulliken lectures on " Household Decoration." 

Miss Huntington attempts to express her opinion in Par- 
liamentary Law. 

Party see Richard Mansfield in "Beau Brummel." 

Darkness reigns supreme. 

Lecture on Domestic Science by Mrs. Ward. 

Party see Harvard German play. 

Party go sleighing to Wellesley Inn, and have fudge, 
cake and hot chocolate. 

The first school reception. 

Miss Carpenter late for dinner. 

Here endeth the year for the Allerlei Board. 




148 



THE ALLERLEI THE ALLERLEI 



The Allerlei 



What is it that through the long weeks past 

Has given us many an anxious hour, — 
Has worried by day, by night harassed, 

And banished sleep with increasing power? 

The Allerlei. 

What has doubled our work, and shortened our play, 
Has dogged our footsteps, and broken our rest, 

Till sometimes we wondered if it would pay, 
And if, of all others, this -were the best? 

Our Allerlei. 
Now our work is fully completed, 

Our original ideas have reached their limit, 

Our brains, I fear, are sadly depleted, 

But, oh ! 'twill never do to bewail what's in't, — 

This Allerlei. 



Farewell 

Good-by, school days, I'm going home : 
Thou wert my friends and I was thine ; 
Long through thy lessons did I toil, 
And oft did burn the midnight oil ; 
But now to other things I turn, — 
Good-by, school days, I'm going home. 

I'm going to another life, 
To other scenes and other strife ; 
Mayhap where life is all morning, 
Where birds the livelong day do sing ; 
Mayhap to fields of new dismay, 
Where battles must be fought each day. 

Yet whether weal or woe should come, 
Good-by, schooldays, I'm going home. 



[ 49 



THE ALLERLEI ALLERLEI BOARD 



Jess Tucker 
Etta Handy 
Helen E. Carter 

MA^ion Stahl 
Martha Laurens 

Lilian Douglass 
Cornelia Eaton 

FloRence Disman 
Esther Levi 

E'>NA SlSSON 

Fern DIxon 

Bess Racon 
MarjO r ie Gunn 
Helen WA't 

GRace Vicary 
Cora Oanforth 



151 



152 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



E. B. PARKER 

{Ffoots 

and 

Shoes 



WELLESLEY, MASS. 



Washington Street, next to Post Office 



Dowsley & Laf f ee 

High-Class and Exclusive Designs in 

Carter ... 
iWtlltnerp 

1 68 Tremont Street, Boston, Mass. 

Delicious Chocolates, Bonbons and 
Ice Cream Soda 

146 TREMONT ST., - BOSTON, MASS. 



Picture Framing 

ALL FRAMING NEATLY DONE 

Framed Pictures 
Fine Stationery 



Full Line of Eaton Hurlbut Paper 



*UL 



^o the Pupils and 

Graduates of Lasell 



€I,We wish to call your attention to our 
large stock of sheet music, musical liter- 
ature, and music books. All the pop- 
ular and classical music constantly on 
hand. We fill orders promptly by mail 
or express the same day as received. 
When in Boston call and look over our 
new music. When you are home, if 
not near a music store, write to us and 
we will give your orders our immediate 
attention. 

Respectfully, 

C. W. Thompson & Co., 
13 West St., Boston, Mass. 



MORGAN'S ART STORE 

29 MOODY STREET, WALTHAM, MASS. Our catalogue and order blank sent on request 



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154 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



The BRISTOL ALL-METAL 
WINDOW SCREENS 

WOOD-FRAME SCREENS AND SCREEN DOORS 



R 

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S 
S 




NEAT 



STRONG 



DURABLE 



WRITE FOR CATALOGUE AND ESTIMATES 



PREST & DIXON, ::: Bristol, R. I. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



155 



G. L. ABLLL 



Art Pictures 
Framing 



Metal Frames 
Photo Mailers 



Developing and Printing for 
Amateurs 

Teco and Van Briggle Pottery 

Plaster Casts, College Seals 

TELEPHONE, 

Wellesley 5q. :: Wellesley, Mass. 



Established 1858 



Jf tne Jf urs 

Ldw. Kakas & Sons 

162 TRLMONT STREET 

NEXT TO KEITH THEATRE 



Special discount to students 



John A. Morgan & Co. 



PHARMACISTS 



Shattuck Building 



Wellesley, Mass. 



P. P. ADAMS' 

Big Dry Goods Department Store is the 
leader on 

Shirt Waists, Skirts and Suits 

133-135-137-139 Moody St. 

WALTHAM 



C. W. Thompson & Co. 

Jflugtc gealerg 

Publishers of the Following Hits 



Signet Waltz . . Samuel Colburn 

Apollinaris Waltz . C. Lawrence Smith, Jr. 



.75 
.60 
.60 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.75 

Wistaria Japanese Intermezzo, A. H. Virtue .50 
Mountain Side Reverie . Eugene Goudey .50 

Fluttering Fancies Intermezzo, R. A. Foss .50 

If I Were a Violet. Song, C. H. Cox, Jr. .50 
A Beautiful Ballad with Refrain 



Sybil Waltzes 
Algonquin Intermezzo 
Fraternitas March . 
Basket Ball Girls' March 
Forest Melodies 



. Myrtle Chase 

M. A. Marks, Jr. 

John H. Densmore 

. F. M. Babb 

A. W. Newcomb 



13 WEST ST., 



BOSTON, MASS. 



aa 



After July I st, 1 906, we shall move to our new location 
cor. Park and Tremont Sts. Store (Park St. Church) 



156 



ADVERTISEMENTS 









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ADVERTISEMENTS 



157 



WOODLAND PARK HOTEL 

AUBURNDALE, MASSACHUSETTS 

Nine Miles from Boston by B. & A. R. R. or Boulevard Electrics. Ten acres of superb 

grounds. Golf, Tennis, etc. 



Sun Parlor comfort- 
able in coldest 
weather 

Rooms singly or en 
suite with or 
without private 
baths 




FIVE MINUTES 

WALK FROM 

LASELL 



OPEN THE ENTIRE YEAR 



FREDERICK WILKEY, Proprietor 

Telephone 21270, Newton West 



HOTEL MATTAQUASON 

CHATHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 

Forty miles at sea, all rail, most delightful situation on Cape Cod 

Open July 1st to September 



Booklet and Information on Application 



FREDERICK WILKEY, Proprietor 

Woodland Park Hotel, Auburndale, Mass. 



158 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




NAME ON EVERY PIECE" 

CHOCOLATE BONBONS 

DELICIOUS DAINTY PURE 

50 cts. and 60 cts. per pound 

Retail Store — 4 1 6 Washington St., Boston 



4$xan& T33oob, {pxinttt 



(Ytta&ev of QBoofts, flttaa^ines, 
Cata,to$utB ano (&ol?ettisitur 
&\Uvat\xvt of £i?er£ ©escrtp 
tton i»tt# Office an& 'Worftsijop 
352 TDas^in^ton J&t., QBoston, 
rmassae^usett© = £eftf>#one 
3T3 (main * * * * * * = 



Mlle. FELICIE 



BRINGTON ROAD 



BROOKLI NE 



Fine D)illinerp 

Ladies' and Misses' Hats 

:: ALSO : : 

Feathers .Cleansed ana Curled 

H. W. MURRAY 

WLLLL5LLY 5QUARL 



SPARROW & ARTHUR 



Millinery 



37 TEMPLE PLACE - - BOSTON 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



159 



PURDY 



PHOTOGRAPHER TO 
LASELL FOR THE YEAR 




oilJo 



J. E. PURDY & CO., 1 46 Tremont Street 

BETWEEN TEMPLE PLACE AND WEST STREET 



160 



ADVERTISMENTS 



LASELL SEMINARY 



AUBURNDALE 



MASSACHUSETTS 



C. C. BRAGDON, Principal 




sx 



1 In 







CLARK COTTAGE 



A SCHOOL WHICH AIMS TO GIVE ITS YOUNG WOMEN A BROAD 
CULTURE, GOOD HEALTH, AND PRACTICAL ABILITY TO MANAGE 
AND TO GRACE A HOME o?o o% o?o cSb o% c& cSb tSb c& 






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